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Int J Med Educ. 2018 Jul 27;9:206-212. doi: 10.5116/ijme.5b40.6e4b.

Host clinical preceptors' perceptions of professionalism among learners completing global health electives.

Author information

1
Division of Emergency Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, USA.
2
University of Utah, Department of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.
3
Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.
4
Baylor College of Medicine Children's Foundation Lesotho, Maseru, Lesotho.
5
Baylor College of Medicine Children's Foundation Malawi, Lilongwe, Malawi.

Abstract

Objectives:

This study aims to gain an understanding of the perceptions of host clinical preceptors in Malawi and Lesotho of the professionalism exhibited by short-term learners from the United States and Canada during short-term global health electives.

Methods:

Focus group discussions were conducted with 11 host clinical preceptors at two outpatient pediatric HIV clinics in sub-Saharan Africa (Malawi and Lesotho). These clinics host approximately 50 short-term global health learners from the United States and Canada each year. Focus group moderators used open-ended discussion guides to explore host clinical preceptors' perceptions of the professionalism of short-term global health learners. Thematic analysis with an inductive approach was used to identify salient themes from these focus group discussions.

Results:

Eleven of the 18 possible respondents participated in two focus group discussions. Adaptability, eagerness to learn, active listening, gratitude, initiative, and punctuality was cited as professional behaviors among short-term global health learners. Cited unprofessional behaviors included disregard of local clinicians' expertise and unresponsiveness to feedback. Host clinical preceptors described difficulty providing feedback to short-term global health learners and discrepancies between what may be considered professional in their home setting versus in the study settings. Respondents requested pre-departure orientation for learners and their own orientation before hosting learners.

Conclusions:

Both host clinical preceptors and short-term global health learners should be aware that behaviors that may be considered best practice in one clinical setting may be perceived as unprofessional in another. Future studies to develop a common definition of professionalism during short-term global health electives are merited.

KEYWORDS:

global health; host perspective; medical education; professionalism; sub-saharan africa

PMID:
30055101
PMCID:
PMC6129158
DOI:
10.5116/ijme.5b40.6e4b
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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