Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nicotine Tob Res. 2018 Jul 19. doi: 10.1093/ntr/nty154. [Epub ahead of print]

Electronic cigarette use and understanding among a national sample of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Islander smokers.

Author information

1
Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Casuarina, Australia.
2
Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation Collingwood VIC, Australia.
3
Alcohol, Tobacco & Other Drugs Association of ACT., Watson, ACT, Australia.
4
Cancer Council Victoria. Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

Abstract

Introduction:

Adult daily smoking prevalence in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population is 2.8 times that of other Australians. There is little data on prevalence of electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. We measured e-cigarette use and beliefs about their harmfulness in national samples of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers and of all Australian smokers.

Methods:

The Talking About The Smokes project interviewed a nationally-representative quota sample of 1,301 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers between August 2013 and August 2014. The Australian Wave 9 survey of the long-running International Tobacco Control Project interviewed 1,093 smokers between February and May 2013. Estimates for all Australian smokers were standardised to the age and sex distribution of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers.

Results:

Fewer Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander than all Australian smokers had tried an e-cigarette (21% vs 30%). This was in part due to more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers having not heard of e-cigarettes. Fewer Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers than all Australian smokers agreed that e-cigarettes are less harmful than conventional cigarettes (22% vs 50%).

Conclusions:

Many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers have used e-cigarettes. However, there is considerable misunderstanding about the relative harm of e-cigarettes compared to conventional cigarettes, in part due to the tight regulatory environment in Australia.

PMID:
30053109
DOI:
10.1093/ntr/nty154

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center