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J Am Coll Cardiol. 2018 Jul 31;72(5):553-568. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2018.05.030.

A Clinician's Guide for Trending Cardiovascular Nutrition Controversies: Part II.

Author information

1
Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, National Jewish Health, Denver, Colorado. Electronic address: andrew@docandrew.com.
2
Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina.
3
Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Lifespan Cardiovascular Institute and Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island.
4
INTERVENT International, Savannah, Georgia.
5
George Washington University School of Medicine, Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, Washington, DC.
6
Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, Cleveland, Ohio.
7
Lipid Clinic, Endocrinology and Nutrition Service, Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, Spain; Ciber Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain.
8
Gaples Institute for Integrative Cardiology, Deerfield, Illinois; Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois.
9
Department of Cardiology, Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute, Kansas City, Missouri.
10
Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.
11
Preventive Medicine Research Institute, Sausalito, California; Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California.
12
Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois.
13
Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Wilford Hall Ambulatory Surgical Center, San Antonio, Texas.
14
Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Montefiore Health System, Bronx, New York.
15
Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina.
16
Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
17
Department of Cardiovascular & Pulmonary Medicine, Bellin Health, Green Bay, Wisconsin.
18
Department of Food and Nutrition, New York-Presbyterian, New York, New York.
19
Department of Cardiology, Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, Huntington, West Virginia.
20
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania.

Abstract

The potential cardiovascular (CV) benefits of many trending foods and dietary patterns are still incompletely understood, and scientific inquiry continues to evolve. In the meantime, however, a number of controversial dietary patterns, foods, and nutrients have received significant media attention and are mired by "hype." This second review addresses some of the more recent popular foods and dietary patterns that are recommended for CV health to provide clinicians with current information for patient discussions in the clinical setting. Specifically, this paper delves into dairy products, added sugars, legumes, coffee, tea, alcoholic beverages, energy drinks, mushrooms, fermented foods, seaweed, plant and marine-derived omega-3-fatty acids, and vitamin B12.

KEYWORDS:

B12; OM3; coffee; dairy; dairy products; energy drinks; fermented foods; fish oil; healthy dietary patterns; legumes; mushrooms; nutrition; seaweed; tea

PMID:
30049315
DOI:
10.1016/j.jacc.2018.05.030

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