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Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2018 Jun 26;2018:2917981. doi: 10.1155/2018/2917981. eCollection 2018.

The Protective Role of Brain CYP2J in Parkinson's Disease Models.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071, China.
2
Demonstration Center for Experimental Basic Medicine Education, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071, China.

Abstract

CYP2J proteins are present in the neural cells of human and rodent brain regions. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of brain CYP2J in Parkinson's disease. Rats received right unilateral injection with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in the substantia nigra following transfection with or without the CYP2J3 expression vector. Compared with LPS-treated rats, CYP2J3 transfection significantly decreased apomorphine-induced rotation by 57.3% at day 12 and 47.0% at day 21 after LPS treatment; moreover, CYP2J3 transfection attenuated the accumulation of α-synuclein. Compared with the 6-OHDA group, the number of rotations by rats transfected with CYP2J3 decreased by 59.6% at day 12 and 43.5% at day 21 after 6-OHDA treatment. The loss of dopaminergic neurons and the inhibition of the antioxidative system induced by LPS or 6-OHDA were attenuated following CYP2J3 transfection. The TLR4-MyD88 signaling pathway was involved in the downregulation of brain CYP2J induced by LPS, and CYP2J transfection upregulated the expression of Nrf2 via the inhibition of miR-340 in U251 cells. The data suggest that increased levels of CYP2J in the brain can delay the pathological progression of PD initiated by inflammation or neurotoxins. The alteration of the metabolism of the endogenous substrates (e.g., AA) could affect the risk of neurodegenerative disease.

PMID:
30046373
PMCID:
PMC6038651
DOI:
10.1155/2018/2917981
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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