Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nature. 2018 Jul;559(7715):517-526. doi: 10.1038/s41586-018-0301-1. Epub 2018 Jul 25.

The future of hyperdiverse tropical ecosystems.

Author information

1
Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK. josbarlow@gmail.com.
2
Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK.
3
Embrapa Amazônia Oriental, Belém, Brazil.
4
Stockholm Environment Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
5
Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
6
Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, USA.
7
Biodiversity and Biocomplexity Unit, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, Onna, Japan.
8
School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
9
Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi, Belém, Brazil.
10
Universidade Federal do Pará, Belém, Brazil.
11
School of Science and the Environment, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, UK.
12
School of Environmental Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.
13
University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
14
University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
15
Marine Science Program, Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions, Kensington, Western, Australia.
16
Oceans Institute, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia, Australia.

Abstract

The tropics contain the overwhelming majority of Earth's biodiversity: their terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecosystems hold more than three-quarters of all species, including almost all shallow-water corals and over 90% of terrestrial birds. However, tropical ecosystems are also subject to pervasive and interacting stressors, such as deforestation, overfishing and climate change, and they are set within a socio-economic context that includes growing pressure from an increasingly globalized world, larger and more affluent tropical populations, and weak governance and response capacities. Concerted local, national and international actions are urgently required to prevent a collapse of tropical biodiversity.

PMID:
30046075
DOI:
10.1038/s41586-018-0301-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group
Loading ...
Support Center