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Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 Jul 25;15(8). pii: E1574. doi: 10.3390/ijerph15081574.

Spatial Distribution of Fine Particulate Matter in Underground Passageways.

Author information

1
Center for Intelligent Transportation Systems and Unmanned Aerial Systems Applications, State Key Laboratory of Ocean Engineering, School of Naval Architecture, Ocean & Civil Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China. songxinyi618@sjtu.edu.cn.
2
Center for Intelligent Transportation Systems and Unmanned Aerial Systems Applications, State Key Laboratory of Ocean Engineering, School of Naval Architecture, Ocean & Civil Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China. qclu@sjtu.edu.cn.
3
Center for Intelligent Transportation Systems and Unmanned Aerial Systems Applications, State Key Laboratory of Ocean Engineering, School of Naval Architecture, Ocean & Civil Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China. zrpeng@sjtu.edu.cn.
4
China Institute for Urban Governance, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China. zrpeng@sjtu.edu.cn.
5
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA. zrpeng@sjtu.edu.cn.

Abstract

The unfavorable locations of underground infrastructures and poor ventilation facilities can result in the deterioration of enclosed air quality. Some researchers have studied air quality and ventilation measures in different types of underground buildings. However, few studies have investigated the pollution in pedestrian passageways connecting underground structures. Hence, in this paper, we attempted to investigate the spatial distribution of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in underground passageways. First, measurements were designed and conducted in a pedestrian passageway beneath the Shanghai South Railway Station, Shanghai, China. Second, numerical simulations were performed based on computational fluid dynamic (CFD) technology. Finally, the numerical simulations were extended to examine impacts of the ventilation measures on PM2.5 concentration with different inlet positions and air velocity in underground passageways. The simulation results showed good agreement with the experimental data, and the numerical model was validated to be an effective method to investigate the spatial distribution of PM2.5 in underground passageways. Results suggest that building additional entrances is an advisable method for improving air quality in the underground passageways of the Shanghai South Railway Station, while jet fans are not recommended. Findings of this study offer suggestions for mitigating PM2.5 pollution in underground passageways.

KEYWORDS:

PM2.5; computational fluid dynamic (CFD); underground passageway; ventilation

PMID:
30044418
PMCID:
PMC6121543
DOI:
10.3390/ijerph15081574
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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