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Scand J Prim Health Care. 2018 Sep;36(3):227-236. doi: 10.1080/02813432.2018.1487377. Epub 2018 Jul 25.

Urological symptoms among 23,240 men in the general danish population - concerns about symptoms, their persistence and influence on primary care contacts.

Author information

1
a University of Southern Denmark.
2
b Research Unit of General Practice, University of Southern Denmar.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To analyse possible associations between men's likelihood of contacting a general practitioner (GP) for urological symptoms and the persistence of the symptoms, the influence on daily activities and the level of concern about the symptoms.

DESIGN:

Web-based nationwide cross-sectional questionnaire study.

SETTING:

The general population in Denmark.

SUBJECTS:

48,910 randomly selected men aged 20+ years.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Urological symptom prevalence and odds ratios for GP contact with urological symptoms in regard to concern for the symptom, influence on daily activities and the persistence of the symptom.

RESULTS:

Some 23,240 men responded to the questionnaire, yielding a response rate of 49.8%. The prevalence of at least one urological symptom was 59.9%. Among men experiencing at least one urological symptom almost one-fourth reported contact to general practice regarding the symptom. Approximately half of the symptoms reported to be extremely concerning were discussed with a GP.

CONCLUSION:

Increased symptom concern, influence on daily activities and long-term persistence increased the likelihood of contacting a GP with urological symptoms. This research points out that guidelines for PSA testing might be challenged by the high prevalence of urological symptoms. Key points  The decision process of whether to contact the general practitioner (GP) is influenced by different factors, but contradictory results has been found in triggers and barriers for help-seeking with urological symptoms.   • Increased symptom concern, influence on daily activities and long-term persistence consistently increased the likelihood of contacting a general practitioner with urological symptoms in men.   • Only 50% of the symptoms reported to be extremely concerning were however discussed with the GP.   • Guidelines for PSA testing might be challenged by the high prevalence of urological symptoms.

KEYWORDS:

Help-seeking behaviour; general practice; patient acceptance of health care; symptom assessment; urinary incontinence; urination

PMID:
30043660
DOI:
10.1080/02813432.2018.1487377
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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