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Eur J Appl Physiol. 2018 Oct;118(10):2171-2177. doi: 10.1007/s00421-018-3929-5. Epub 2018 Jul 24.

Compression socks and the effects on coagulation and fibrinolytic activation during marathon running.

Author information

1
School of Health Sciences, Sports Performance Optimisation Research Team, University of Tasmania, Locked Bag 1322, Newnham, Tasmania, TA, 7250, Australia. Emma.Zadow@utas.edu.au.
2
School of Health Sciences, Sports Performance Optimisation Research Team, University of Tasmania, Locked Bag 1322, Newnham, Tasmania, TA, 7250, Australia.
3
School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University, Perth, Australia.
4
Department of Health and Medical Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.
5
Menzies Health Institute Queensland and School of Medical Science, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia.
6
School of Nursing and Midwifery and Menzies Health Institute, Queensland, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia.
7
Department of Emergency Medicine, Gold Coast Health, Queensland, Australia.
8
Department of Physiology, Australian Institute of Sport, Belconnen, Canberra, Australia.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Compression socks are frequently used in the treatment and prevention of lower-limb pathologies; however, when combined with endurance-based exercise, the impact of compression socks on haemostatic activation remains unclear.

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate the effect of wearing compression socks on coagulation and fibrinolysis following a marathon.

METHODS:

Sixty-seven participants [43 males (mean ± SD: age: 46.7 ± 10.3 year) and 24 females (age: 40.0 ± 11.0 year)] were allocated into a compression (SOCK, n = 34) or control (CONTROL, n = 33) group. Venous blood samples were obtained 24 h prior to and immediately POST-marathon, and were analyzed for thrombin-anti-thrombin complex (TAT), tissue factor (TF), tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), and D-Dimer.

RESULTS:

Compression significantly attenuated the post-exercise increase in D-Dimer compared to the control group [median (range) SOCK: + 9.02 (- 0.34 to 60.7) ng/mL, CONTROL: + 25.48 (0.95-73.24) ng/mL]. TF increased following the marathon run [median (range), SOCK: + 1.19 (- 7.47 to 9.11) pg/mL, CONTROL: + 3.47 (- 5.01 to 38.56) pg/mL] in all runners. No significant post-exercise changes were observed for TAT and TFPI.

CONCLUSIONS:

While activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis was apparent in all runners POST-marathon, wearing compression socks was shown to reduce fibrinolytic activity, as demonstrated by lower D-Dimer concentrations. Compression may reduce exercise-associated haemostatic activation when completing prolonged exercise.

KEYWORDS:

Compression; D-dimer; Thrombin–anti-thrombin complexes; Tissue factor; Tissue factor pathway inhibitor

PMID:
30043183
DOI:
10.1007/s00421-018-3929-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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