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Obes Surg. 2018 Nov;28(11):3524-3530. doi: 10.1007/s11695-018-3378-6.

Is Pre-operation Social Connectedness Associated with Weight Loss up to 2 Years Post Bariatric Surgery?

Author information

1
Research Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK. urszula.tymoszuk.12@ucl.ac.uk.
2
Research Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK.
3
Institute for Social and Economic Research (ISER), University of Essex, Colchester, UK.
4
Centre for Obesity Research, Rayne Institute, Department of Medicine, University College London, London, UK.
5
University College London Hospital (UCLH) Centre for Weight Management and Metabolic Surgery, London, UK.
6
Division of Surgery and Interventional Sciences, University College London, London, UK.
7
Clinical and Experimental Surgery Department, Medical Research Institute, University of Alexandria, Hadara, Alexandria, Egypt.
8
MRC Unit for Lifelong Health and Ageing at UCL, London, UK.
9
National Institute of Health Research, UCLH Biomedical Research Centre, London, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

To date, little attention has been paid to supportive relationships as factors contributing to weight loss from bariatric surgery.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

This prospective study examined whether total percentage weight loss (%TWL) at 3, 12 and 24 months post-surgery varies by distinct aspects of pre-surgery social support (received emotional and practical support and contact with friends and family) in a sample of bariatric surgery candidates (n = 182). These associations were tested with linear regression models adjusted for gender, age, ethnicity, employment status, self-esteem, mastery and time elapsed since the day of surgery.

RESULTS:

One hundred fifty-four participants underwent a bariatric procedure, and all but seven provided weight loss data at least at one occasion. Emotional support and contact with friends were positively associated with %TWL at 3, 12 and 24 months, and the magnitude of these associations was large. For instance, in the fully adjusted models, %TWL at 24 months increased by 2.36% (SE 1.17, p = 0.048) with each increase of one standard deviation in emotional support and was higher by 9.23% (SE 4.31, p = 0.035) for participants who reported seeing 1-5 friends per month compared with those who saw none. There was some evidence for a positive association between practical support and %TWL at 3 and 12 months post-surgery.

CONCLUSION:

Supportive relationships are important contributors to weight loss from bariatric surgery. If replicated in future studies, these findings could inform clinical care and interventions aimed at improving support systems of bariatric surgery candidates.

KEYWORDS:

Close relationships; Gastric bypass; Gastric sleeve; Metabolic surgery; Obesity; Social support; Weight management

PMID:
30043144
DOI:
10.1007/s11695-018-3378-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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