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Sci Rep. 2018 Jul 24;8(1):11159. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-29277-x.

Associations Between Nutrition, Gut Microbiome, and Health in A Novel Nonhuman Primate Model.

Author information

1
Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, University of Minnesota, 1971 Commonwealth Avenue, Saint Paul, MN, 55108, USA.
2
GreenViet Biodiversity Conservation Center, K39/21 Thanh Vinh Street, Son Tra District, Da Nang, Vietnam.
3
Primate Microbiome Project, 6-124 MCB, 420 Washington Ave SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA.
4
Biomedical Informatics and Computational Biology, 200 Union St SE, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA.
5
Frankfurt Zoological Society, Bernhard-Grzimek-Allee 1, 60316, Frankfurt, Germany.
6
Wildlife Nutrition Centre, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, 80 Mandai Lake Road, 729826, Singapore, Singapore.
7
Biotechnology Institute, University of Minnesota, 1479 Gortner Avenue, Saint Paul, MN, 55108, USA.
8
Faculty of Biology and Environmental Science, The University of Da Nang - University of Science and Education, 459 Ton Duc Thang Street, Lien Chieu District, Da Nang, Vietnam.
9
Department of Veterinary Population Medicine, University of Minnesota, 1365 Gortner Avenue, 225 Veterinary Medical Center, Saint Paul, MN, 55108, USA.
10
Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado Boulder, 1350 Pleasant St, 233 UCB, Boulder, CO, 80309, USA.
11
Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, Duke University, 130 Science Drive, 104 Biological Sciences, Durham, NC, 27708, USA.
12
Endangered Primate Rescue Center, Cuc Phuong National Park, Nho Quan District, Ninh Binh Province, Vietnam.
13
Philadelphia Zoological Garden, 3400 West Girard Avenue, Philadelphia, PA, 19108, USA.
14
School of Sociology and Anthropology, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, 510275, China.
15
Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Minnesota, 4-192 Keller Hall, 200 Union St SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA.
16
Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, University of Minnesota, 1971 Commonwealth Avenue, Saint Paul, MN, 55108, USA. joh04207@umn.edu.
17
Primate Microbiome Project, 6-124 MCB, 420 Washington Ave SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA. joh04207@umn.edu.
18
University of Minnesota, Mid-Central Research and Outreach Center, Willmar, Minnesota, USA. joh04207@umn.edu.

Abstract

Red-shanked doucs (Pygathrix nemaeus) are endangered, foregut-fermenting colobine primates which are difficult to maintain in captivity. There are critical gaps in our understanding of their natural lifestyle, including dietary habits such as consumption of leaves, unripe fruit, flowers, seeds, and other plant parts. There is also a lack of understanding of enteric adaptations, including their unique microflora. To address these knowledge gaps, we used the douc as a model to study relationships between gastrointestinal microbial community structure and lifestyle. We analyzed published fecal samples as well as detailed dietary history from doucs with four distinct lifestyles (wild, semi-wild, semi-captive, and captive) and determined gastrointestinal bacterial microbiome composition using 16S rRNA sequencing. A clear gradient of microbiome composition was revealed along an axis of natural lifestyle disruption, including significant associations with diet, biodiversity, and microbial function. We also identified potential microbial biomarkers of douc dysbiosis, including Bacteroides and Prevotella, which may be related to health. Our results suggest a gradient-like shift in captivity causes an attendant shift to severe gut dysbiosis, thereby resulting in gastrointestinal issues.

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