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Vaccine. 2018 Aug 9;36(33):4979-4992. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2018.06.044. Epub 2018 Jul 4.

A report on the status of vaccination in Europe.

Author information

1
GSK, Avenue Fleming 20, 1300 Wavre, Belgium. Electronic address: shazia.x.sheikh@gsk.com.
2
Deloitte Belgium, Luchthaven Nationaal 1 J, 1930 Zaventem, Belgium. Electronic address: elianabiundo@gmail.com.
3
GSK, Avenue Fleming 20, 1300 Wavre, Belgium. Electronic address: soizic.m.courcier@gsk.com.
4
Department of Health Economics and Health Care Management, School of Public Health, Bielefeld University, Universitätsstraße 25, 33615 Bielefeld, Germany. Electronic address: oliver.damm@uni-bielefeld.de.
5
Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Inserm CIC 1417, Assistance Publique Hopitaux de Paris (APHP), CIC Cochin-Pasteur, rue du Faubourg St Jacques 27, 75679 Paris cedex 14, France. Electronic address: odile.launay@aphp.fr.
6
Deloitte Belgium, Luchthaven Nationaal 1 J, 1930 Zaventem, Belgium. Electronic address: edith.maes@outlook.be.
7
GSK, Avenue Fleming 20, 1300 Wavre, Belgium. Electronic address: camelia.g.marcos@gsk.com.
8
GSK, Great West Road 980, Brentford TW8 9GS, UK.
9
Deloitte Belgium, Luchthaven Nationaal 1 J, 1930 Zaventem, Belgium. Electronic address: cmeijer@deloitte.com.
10
Institute of Public Health, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Largo Francesco Vito 1, 00168 Rome, Italy. Electronic address: andrea.poscia@unicatt.it.
11
Unit of PharmacoTherapy, -Epidemiology & -Economics, University of Groningen, Groningen Research Institute of Pharmacy, Antonius Deusinglaan 1, 9713 AV Groningen, The Netherlands; Department of Health Sciences, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Antonius Deusinglaan 1, 9713 AV Groningen, The Netherlands; Department of Economics, Econometrics & Finance, University of Groningen, Faculty of Economics & Business, Groningen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: m.j.postma@rug.nl.
12
Deloitte Belgium, Luchthaven Nationaal 1 J, 1930 Zaventem, Belgium. Electronic address: rsaka@DELOITTE.com.
13
European Center of Pharmaceutical Medicine, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 61, 4056 Basel, Switzerland. Electronic address: thomas.szucs@unibas.ch.
14
GSK, Avenue Fleming 20, 1300 Wavre, Belgium.

Abstract

Vaccine policy, decision processes and outcomes vary widely across Europe. The objective was to map these factors across 16 European countries by assessing (A) national vaccination strategy and implementation, (B) attributes of healthcare vaccination systems, and (C) outcomes of universal mass vaccination (UMV) as a measure of how successful the vaccination policy is. A. Eleven countries use standardised assessment frameworks to inform vaccine recommendations. Only Sweden horizon scans new technologies, uses standard assessments, systematic literature and health economic reviews, and publishes its decision rationale. Time from European marketing authorisation to UMV implementation varies despite these standard frameworks. Paediatric UMV recommendations (generally government-funded) are relatively comparable, however only influenza vaccine is widely recommended for adults. B. Fourteen countries aim to report annually on national vaccine coverage rates (VCRs), as well as have target VCRs per vaccine across different age groups. Ten countries use either electronic immunisation records or a centralised registry for childhood vaccinations, and seven for other age group vaccinations. C. National VCRs for infant (primary diphtheria tetanus pertussis (DTP)), adolescent (human papillomavirus (HPV)) and older adult (seasonal influenza) UMV programmes found ranges of: 89.1% to 98.2% for DTP-containing vaccines, 5% to 85.9% for HPV vaccination, and 4.3% to 71.6% for influenza vaccine. Regarding reported disease incidence, a wide range was found across countries for measles, mumps and rubella (in children), and hepatitis B and invasive pneumococcal disease (in all ages). These findings reflect an individual approach to vaccination by country. High VCRs can be achieved, particularly for paediatric vaccinations, despite different approaches, targets and reporting systems; these are not replicated in vaccines for other age groups in the same country. Additional measures to improve VCRs across all age groups are needed and could benefit from greater harmonisation in target setting, vaccination data collection and sharing across EU countries.

KEYWORDS:

Coverage; Decision-making; Europe; Performance; Policy; Vaccination

PMID:
30037416
DOI:
10.1016/j.vaccine.2018.06.044
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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