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World Neurosurg. 2018 Oct;118:360-367. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2018.07.099. Epub 2018 Jul 20.

Right Hemisphere Cognitive Functions: From Clinical and Anatomical Bases to Brain Mapping During Awake Craniotomy. Part II: Neuropsychological Tasks and Brain Mapping.

Author information

1
Service de Neurochirurgie, CHU d'Angers, Angers, France; CRCINA, INSERM, Université de Nantes, Université d'Angers, Angers, France.
2
Service de Neurochirurgie, CHU d'Angers, Angers, France; Laboratoire d'Anatomie, Faculté de Médecine d'Angers, Angers, France.
3
Département d'Anesthésie-Réanimation, CHU d'Angers, Angers, France; LARIS EA 7315, Image Signal et Sciences du Vivant, Angers Teaching Hospital, Angers, France.
4
Service de Neurochirurgie, CHU d'Angers, Angers, France; CRCINA, INSERM, Université de Nantes, Université d'Angers, Angers, France. Electronic address: phmenei@chu-angers.fr.

Abstract

The nondominant hemisphere (usually right) is determinant for main cognitive functions such as visuospatial and social cognitions. Awake surgery using direct electrical stimulation for right cerebral tumor removal remains challenging due to the complexity of the functional anatomy and the difficulties in adapting the classical bedside tasks for awake surgery conditions. An understanding of semiology, anatomical bases, and an analysis of the available cognitive tasks for visuospatial and social cognition per operative mapping will allow neurosurgeons to better appreciate the functional anatomy of the right hemisphere and its application to tumor surgery. In this second review of 2 parts, we discuss the pertinence of the neuropsychological tests available for the study of nondominant hemisphere functions for the surgery on right-sided tumors in awake surgery conditions. In conjunction with part I of the review, which focuses primarily on the anatomical, functional, and semiological basis of the right hemisphere function, this article provides a comprehensive review of current knowledge supporting the awake surgery in the right hemisphere.

KEYWORDS:

Awake surgery; Nondominant hemisphere; Social cognition; Unilateral neglect; Visuospatial cognition

PMID:
30036711
DOI:
10.1016/j.wneu.2018.07.099
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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