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J Biol Rhythms. 2018 Oct;33(5):451-457. doi: 10.1177/0748730418789506. Epub 2018 Jul 23.

Circadian Health and Light: A Report on the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Workshop.

Author information

1
Center for Circadian and Sleep Medicine, Department of Neurology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois.
2
Illinois School of Architecture, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, Illinois.
3
Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York.
4
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
5
Department of Biology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.
6
Departments of Structural and Cellular Biology, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana.
7
Department of Behavioral Medicine and Psychiatry, Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia.
8
Departments of Medicine and Psychiatry & Human Behavior, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island.
9
Sleep and Chronobiology Laboratory, Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado.
10
Division of the National Toxicology Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina.
11
Division of Lung Diseases, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.

Abstract

Despite the omnipresence of artificial and natural light exposure, there exists little guidance in the United States and elsewhere on light exposure in terms of timing, intensity, spectrum, and other light characteristics known to affect human health, performance, and well-being; in parallel, there is little information regarding the quantity and characteristics of light exposure that people receive. To address this, the National Center on Sleep Disorders Research, in the Division of Lung Diseases, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, held a workshop in August 2016 on circadian health and light. Workshop participants discussed scientific research advances on the effects of light on human physiology, identified remaining knowledge gaps in these research areas, and articulated opportunities to use appropriate lighting to protect and improve circadian-dependent health. Based on this workshop, participants put forth the following strategic intent, objectives, and strategies to guide discovery, measurement, education, and implementation of the appropriate use of light to achieve, promote, and maintain circadian health in modern society.

KEYWORDS:

built environment; circadian rhythms; light exposure; public health; sleep

PMID:
30033850
PMCID:
PMC6414068
[Available on 2019-10-01]
DOI:
10.1177/0748730418789506
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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