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Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. 2018 Oct;127(10):698-702. doi: 10.1177/0003489418789178. Epub 2018 Jul 21.

Grill-Cleaning Wire Brush Bristle Ingestion: Case Series and Review of the Literature.

Author information

1
1 Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, NY.
2
2 Department of Otolaryngology, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The authors report a small case series of an unusual ingested foreign body, wire brush bristles, whose small size can present a challenge for endoscopic removal. The authors describe transnasal endoscopic removal and provide a literature review.

METHODS:

From 2011 to 2017, 8 patients presented to an academic tertiary medical center with ingestion of wire brush bristles. The patients' medical records were reviewed and are described in this report, along with a literature review.

RESULTS:

In 4 patients, the bristles were in the lingual tonsils. In 1 patient, a bristle was within the pharyngoepiglottic fold and lingual tonsils. Three patients underwent office removal with a fiber-optic laryngoscope under local anesthesia. Two patients underwent direct laryngoscopy with bristle removal. In 1 patient the wire bristle transected the esophagus, requiring an open procedure. One patient presented with a complicated deep-space neck infection.

CONCLUSIONS:

Wire brush bristles easily become displaced and subsequently become lodged in the upper aerodigestive tract. Localization of a bristle can be difficult on examination and laryngoscopy. Radiography can be performed, but computed tomographic examination with contrast is superior for precise localization for preparation for an operative approach. Depending on the precise location of the bristle, endoscopic removal using a fiber-optic channeled scope may be a safe and effective solution.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

Case Series, IV.

KEYWORDS:

bristle brush; endoscopic removal bristle; endoscopic removal wire; wire bristle

PMID:
30032647
DOI:
10.1177/0003489418789178
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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