Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neurobiol Aging. 2018 Oct;70:217-232. doi: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2018.06.028. Epub 2018 Jun 30.

Dissociable effects of advanced age on prefrontal cortical and medial temporal lobe ensemble activity.

Author information

1
McKnight Brain Institute, Department of Neuroscience, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.
2
Department of Psychology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico.
3
McKnight Brain Institute, Department of Neuroscience, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL; Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.
4
McKnight Brain Institute, Department of Neuroscience, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL; Institute on Aging, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. Electronic address: burkes@ufl.edu.

Abstract

The link between age-related cellular changes within brain regions and larger scale neuronal ensemble dynamics critical for cognition has not been fully elucidated. The present study measured neuron activity within medial prefrontal cortex (PFC), perirhinal cortex (PER), and hippocampal subregion CA1 of young and aged rats by labeling expression of the immediate-early gene Arc. The proportion of cells expressing Arc was quantified at baseline and after a behavior that requires these regions. In addition, PER and CA1 projection neurons to PFC were identified with retrograde labeling. Within CA1, no age-related differences in neuronal activity were observed in the entire neuron population or within CA1 pyramidal cells that project to PFC. Although behavior was comparable across age groups, behaviorally driven Arc expression was higher in the deep layers of both PER and PFC and lower in the superficial layers of these regions. Moreover, age-related changes in activity levels were most evident within PER cells that project to PFC. These data suggest that the PER-PFC circuit is particularly vulnerable in advanced age.

KEYWORDS:

Arc; CA1; Cognition; Infralimbic cortex; Prelimbic cortex

Comment in

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center