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Gastroenterology. 2018 Nov;155(5):1383-1391.e5. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2018.07.017. Epub 2018 Jul 19.

Effects of Organized Colorectal Cancer Screening on Cancer Incidence and Mortality in a Large Community-Based Population.

Author information

1
Kaiser Permanente Medical Center, Walnut Creek, California; Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, California. Electronic address: theodore.levin@kp.org.
2
Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, California.
3
Department of Research and Evaluation, Kaiser Permanente Southern California, Pasadena, California.
4
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York.
5
Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

Little information is available on the effectiveness of organized colorectal cancer (CRC) screening on screening uptake, incidence, and mortality in community-based populations.

METHODS:

We contrasted screening rates, age-adjusted annual CRC incidence, and incidence-based mortality rates before (baseline year 2000) and after (through 2015) implementation of organized screening outreach, from 2007 through 2008 (primarily annual fecal immunochemical testing and colonoscopy), in a large community-based population. Among screening-eligible individuals 51-75 years old, we calculated annual up-to-date status for cancer screening (by fecal test, sigmoidoscopy, or colonoscopy), CRC incidence, cancer stage distributions, and incidence-based mortality.

RESULTS:

Initiation of organized CRC screening significantly increased the up-to-date status of screening, from 38.9% in 2000 to 82.7% in 2015 (P < .01). Higher rates of screening were associated with a 25.5% reduction in annual CRC incidence between 2000 and 2015, from 95.8 to 71.4 cases/100,000 (P < .01), and a 52.4% reduction in cancer mortality, from 30.9 to 14.7 deaths/100,000 (P < .01). Increased screening was initially associated with increased CRC incidence, due largely to greater detection of early-stage cancers, followed by decreases in cancer incidence. Advanced-stage CRC incidence rates decreased 36.2%, from 45.9 to 29.3 cases/100,000 (P < .01), and early-stage CRC incidence rates decreased 14.5%, from 48.2 to 41.2 cases/100,000 (P < .04).

CONCLUSIONS:

Implementing an organized CRC screening program in a large community-based population rapidly increased screening participation to the ≥80% target set by national organizations. Screening rates were sustainable and associated with substantial decreases in CRC incidence and mortality within short time intervals, consistent with early detection and cancer prevention.

KEYWORDS:

Colon Cancer; Early Detection; FIT; Neoplasm

PMID:
30031768
PMCID:
PMC6240353
DOI:
10.1053/j.gastro.2018.07.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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