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Dig Dis Sci. 2018 Nov;63(11):2992-2997. doi: 10.1007/s10620-018-5207-0. Epub 2018 Jul 19.

Sleep Disturbances Can Be Prospectively Observed in Patients with an Inactive Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

Author information

1
Department of Gastroenterology, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, 12 Shmuel Bait St, 9103102, Jerusalem, Israel. ariellash@szmc.org.il.
2
Hebrew University of Jerusalem, School of Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel. ariellash@szmc.org.il.
3
Pulmonary Department, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel.
4
Hebrew University of Jerusalem, School of Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel.
5
Department of Gastroenterology, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, 12 Shmuel Bait St, 9103102, Jerusalem, Israel.
6
Obstetric Department, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel.
7
Pulmonary Department, Meir Medical Center, Kfar Saba, Israel.
8
Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Poor sleep quality is associated with adverse health consequences. Sleep disturbances can impact the immune function and inflammatory processes. Little is known about sleep disturbances in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), while not in flare, i.e., inactive.

AIMS:

To prospectively explore the sleep quality of patients with an inactive IBD.

METHODS:

This pilot study included 36 consecutive patients with IBD and 27 healthy volunteers. All IBD patients had an inactive disease. Participants underwent an overnight ambulatory polysomnography. Data on disease duration, medications, complications, and treatment were collected from the medical records.

RESULTS:

The mean age of the IBD and the control groups was 39 ± 15 and 34.6 ± 9.6 years. A significantly less rapid eye movement (REM) sleep was noted in the IBD group vs. control (23.7 vs. 27.8%, p = 0.047); light sleep percentage and REM latency were also longer in the IBD group. Moreover, oxygen desaturation below 90% was more common in the IBD group. All other sleep parameters including respiratory disturbance index, apnea-hypopnea index, number of wakes, sleep latency, and snoring strength were similar in both groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Inactive IBD is associated with sleep disturbances. A larger prospective study should be conducted to confirm these findings.

KEYWORDS:

Crohn’s disease; Inflammatory bowel disease; Oximetry; Polysomnography; Sleep

PMID:
30027514
DOI:
10.1007/s10620-018-5207-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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