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Nat Commun. 2018 Jul 19;9(1):2818. doi: 10.1038/s41467-018-04976-1.

Assessment of the impact of shared brain imaging data on the scientific literature.

Author information

1
Center for the Developing Brain, Child Mind Institute, New York, 10022, NY, USA. Michael.Milham@childmind.org.
2
Center for Biomedical Imaging and Neuromodulation, Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, New York, 10962, NY, USA. Michael.Milham@childmind.org.
3
Center for the Developing Brain, Child Mind Institute, New York, 10022, NY, USA.
4
Center for Biomedical Imaging and Neuromodulation, Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, New York, 10962, NY, USA.
5
Centre de Recherches Interdisciplinaires, INSERM U1001, Dpt Frontières du Vivant et de l'Apprendre, University Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, 75014, France.
6
Department of Biomedical Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, 07102, NJ, USA.
7
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Hassenfeld Children's Hospital at NYU Langone, New York, 10016, NY, USA.
8
Department of Psychology, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing, 100049, China.
9
CAS Key Laboratory of Behavioral Science, Institute of Psychology, Beijing, 100101, China.
10
Research Center for Lifespan Development of Mind and Brain (CLIMB) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Research Center, Institute of Psychology, Beijing, 100101, China.
11
Key Laboratory for Brain and Education Sciences, Guangxi Teachers Education University, Nanning, 530001, China.

Abstract

Data sharing is increasingly recommended as a means of accelerating science by facilitating collaboration, transparency, and reproducibility. While few oppose data sharing philosophically, a range of barriers deter most researchers from implementing it in practice. To justify the significant effort required for sharing data, funding agencies, institutions, and investigators need clear evidence of benefit. Here, using the International Neuroimaging Data-sharing Initiative, we present a case study that provides direct evidence of the impact of open sharing on brain imaging data use and resulting peer-reviewed publications. We demonstrate that openly shared data can increase the scale of scientific studies conducted by data contributors, and can recruit scientists from a broader range of disciplines. These findings dispel the myth that scientific findings using shared data cannot be published in high-impact journals, suggest the transformative power of data sharing for accelerating science, and underscore the need for implementing data sharing universally.

PMID:
30026557
PMCID:
PMC6053414
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-018-04976-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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