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Cancer Causes Control. 2018 Sep;29(9):803-813. doi: 10.1007/s10552-018-1056-6. Epub 2018 Jul 17.

Increased inflammatory potential of diet is associated with increased odds of prostate cancer in Argentinian men.

Author information

1
Cancer Prevention and Control Program, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, 29208, USA. shivappa@mailbox.sc.edu.
2
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, 29208, USA. shivappa@mailbox.sc.edu.
3
Connecting Health Innovations LLC, Columbia, SC, 29201, USA. shivappa@mailbox.sc.edu.
4
Instituto de Investigaciones en Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba - Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Haya de la Torre Esq. Enfermera Gordillo, 5016, Ciudad Universitaria, Córdoba, Argentina.
5
Escuela de Nutrición, Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Enrique Barros s/n, 5016, Ciudad Universitaria, Córdoba, Argentina.
6
Cancer Prevention and Control Program, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, 29208, USA.
7
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, 29208, USA.
8
Connecting Health Innovations LLC, Columbia, SC, 29201, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Various aspects of diet, including specific food items and nutrients, have been shown to modulate inflammation and have been implicated in the etiology of prostate cancer (PrCA). No study examining the role of diet-associated inflammation in PrCA has been conducted in Latin America.

METHOD:

We examined the association between the Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII®) and PrCA in a population-based case-control study in Córdoba, Argentina. A total of 153 incident cases of PrCA and 309 controls frequency matched on sex, age (± 5 years), and place of residence were recruited from 2008 to 2015. The DII was developed to determine the inflammatory potential of individuals' diets and was computed from a validated food frequency questionnaire using nutrient data from diet only. Multi-level logistic regression models were fit to evaluate the association between DII scores and PrCA, adjusting for age, body mass index, energy intake, and occupational exposure as first-level covariates and family history of prostate cancer as the second-level variable. Odds ratios were estimated in all subject and stratified by BMI (< 30 vs. ≥ 30 kg/m2).

RESULTS:

Men in the most pro-inflammatory group (tertile 3) had 50% higher odds of having PrCA compared to men in the most anti-inflammatory group (tertile 1) (ORtertile3 vs. tertile1 1.50; 95% CI 1.24-1.80). The odds of prostate cancer were higher in obese men (n = 109, ORtertile3 vs. tertile1 1.81; 95% CI 1.45-2.27), while no association was found among non-obese men (n = 375, ORtertile3 vs. tertile1 0.93; 95% CI 0.25-3.51).

CONCLUSIONS:

A pro-inflammatory diet, reflected by higher DII scores, was positively associated with PrCA occurrence. Based on these results and those from other studies, steps should be taken to promote a diet rich in anti-inflammatory foods, in order to reduce risk of PrCA and other chronic diseases. Future studies should explore this association in a prospective setting.

KEYWORDS:

Argentina; Case–control; Dietary Inflammatory Index; Prostate cancer

PMID:
30019102
PMCID:
PMC6108929
[Available on 2019-09-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s10552-018-1056-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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