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Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 Jul 17;15(7). pii: E1509. doi: 10.3390/ijerph15071509.

Shared Decision-Making and Women's Adherence to Breast and Cervical Cancer Screenings.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Fairleigh Dickinson University, 230 Park Ave, Florham Park, NJ 07932, USA. jayoung@fdu.edu.
2
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Fairleigh Dickinson University, 230 Park Ave, Florham Park, NJ 07932, USA. paiboon@fdu.edu.
3
Social and Administrative Sciences Division, School of Pharmacy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 777 Highland Ave, Madison, WI 53705, USA. olufunmilola.abraham@wisc.edu.
4
Department of Marketing, College of Business, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, 107 Imun-ro, Imun 1-dong, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 02450, Korea. dko@hufs.ac.kr.

Abstract

We examined the effect of shared decision-making (SDM) on women's adherence to breast and cervical cancer screenings and estimated the prevalence and adherence rate of screenings. The study used a descriptive cross-sectional design using the 2017 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) data collected by the National Cancer Institute. Adherence was defined based on the guidelines from the American Cancer Society and the composite measure of shared decision-making was constructed using three items in the data. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to examine the association between the SDM and adherence, controlling for cancer beliefs and socio-demographic variables. The analysis included 742 responses. Weighted to represent the U.S. population, 68.1% adhered to both breast and cervical cancer screening guidelines. The composite measure of SDM was reliable (α = 0.85), and a higher SDM score was associated with women's screening adherence (b = 0.17; p = 0.009). There were still women who did not receive cancer screenings as recommended. The results suggest that the use of the SDM approach for healthcare professionals' communication with patients can improve screening adherence.

KEYWORDS:

cancer prevention; patient centered care; screening; shared decision making; women’s cancer

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