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J Pediatr Surg. 2018 Jun 22. pii: S0022-3468(18)30395-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2018.06.020. [Epub ahead of print]

What pediatric surgeons read: Utilization of APSA email blast literature reviews.

Author information

1
University of Florida, Division of Pediatric Surgery, 1600 SW Archer Rd, PO Box 100119, Gainesville, FL, 32610, USA.
2
University of Louisville, Division of Pediatric Surgery, 315 East Broadway, Suite 565, Louisville, KY, 40202, USA. Electronic address: c0down01@louisville.edu.
3
Seattle Children's Hospital, Division of Pediatric Surgery, 4800 Sand Point Way, NE, Seattle, WA, 98105, USA. Electronic address: adam.goldin@seattlechildrens.org.
4
Stanford University, Division of Pediatric Surgery, 730 Welch Rd, 2(nd) floor - MC 5883, Palo Alto, CA, 94304, USA. Electronic address: dmpowellmd@gmail.com.
5
University of Florida, Division of Pediatric Surgery, 1600 SW Archer Rd, PO Box 100119, Gainesville, FL, 32610, USA. Electronic address: janice.taylor@surgery.ufl.edu.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

American Pediatric Surgical Association (APSA) committees send monthly email blasts to members with links to peer-reviewed publications. This study assesses the utilization of this service.

METHODS:

Email-opening and click-through rates were analyzed from 5/2012 to 4/2017 and compared to APSA and industry standards. Access was analyzed based on subject, disease type, journal, impact factor, and committee. CME questions were added in 10/2014 and emails consolidated in 1/2016. Effects of these changes were analyzed.

RESULTS:

Over 60 months, 281 articles were distributed from 58 journals. Access increased significantly with impact factor (P = 0.0039). Overall email opening rate (53% ± 3%) and click-through rate (37% ± 10%) were significantly higher than all APSA emails (43%,18%, P < 0.0001) and 2017 industry standard (26%,12%,P < 0.0001). Access rates differed significantly between the twenty-five topics covered (P < 0.0001), with the highest access for appendicitis (240 ± 79, P < 0.0001). Common condition articles (157 ± 93) were accessed more than rare (55 ± 60, P < 0.0001). With email consolidation, opening rates increased (53 ± 3 to 55 ± 2, P = 0.003) and click-through rates decreased (40 ± 9 to 30 ± 8, P = 0.0002). By adding CME questions, opening rates increased nonsignificantly (52 ± 3 to 54 ± 2, P = 0.066) and click-through rate decreased significantly(41 ± 10 to 33 ± 9, P = 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

APSA email blasts are valued by members based on high access rates. Click-through rates have declined, potentially indicating user fatigue. APSA members prefer common conditions and high impact factor journals. These data will help refine this service.

LEVEL-OF-EVIDENCE:

Level III.

KEYWORDS:

APSA; Continuing medical education; Email blasts

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