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Int J Cancer. 2018 Nov 15;143(10):2380-2389. doi: 10.1002/ijc.31649. Epub 2018 Jul 17.

Effect of mistimed eating patterns on breast and prostate cancer risk (MCC-Spain Study).

Author information

1
ISGlobal, Barcelona, Spain.
2
IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute), Barcelona, Spain.
3
Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain.
4
CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain.
5
Environmental and Cancer Epidemiology Unit, National Center of Epidemiology, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain.
6
Faculty of Medicine, University of Alcalá, Madrid, Spain.
7
Universidad de Cantabria - IDIVAL, Santander, Spain.
8
Public Health Institute of Navarra, IdiSNA, Pamplona, Spain.
9
Grupo de Investigación en Interacciones Gen-Ambiente y Salud, Instituto de Biomedicina (IBIOMED), Universidad de León, León, Spain.
10
Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, BioDonostia Research Institute, San Sebastian, Spain.
11
Centro de Investigación en Recursos Naturales, Salud, y Medio Ambiente (RENSMA), Universidad de Huelva, Huelva, Spain.
12
Fundación para el Fomento de la Investigación Sanitaria y Biomédica de la Comunitat Valenciana FISABIO - Salud Pública, Valencia, Spain.
13
IDIBELL-Catalan Institute of Oncology, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Catalonia, Spain.
14
Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
15
Unit of Molecular Epidemiology and Genetics in Infections and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, IDIBELL, Catalan Institute of Oncology, Barcelona, Spain.
16
Instituto Universitario de Oncología, Universidad de Oviedo, Oviedo, Asturias, Spain.
17
Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria de Granada (ibs.GRANADA), Hospitales Universitarios de Granada/Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain.
18
Epidemiology Unit and Girona Cancer Registry, Oncology Coordination Plan, Department of Health, Autonomous Government of Catalonia, Catalan Institute of Oncology, Girona Biomedical Research Institute (IdiBGi), Girona, Spain.
19
Cardiovascular & Metabolic Diseases Unit, National Centre for Epidemiology, Carlos III Institute of Health, Madrid, Spain.
20
Public Health Division, Department of Health, Epidemiology Section, Madrid, Spain.
21
Department of Epidemiology, Center of Public Health, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
22
Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Illes Balears (IdISBa), Hospital Universitari Son Espases, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.
23
CIBER Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBEROBN), Madrid, Spain.

Abstract

Modern life involves mistimed sleeping and eating patterns that in experimental studies are associated with adverse health effects. We assessed whether timing of meals is associated with breast and prostate cancer risk taking into account lifestyle and chronotype, a characteristic correlating with preference for morning or evening activity. We conducted a population-based case-control study in Spain, 2008-2013. In this analysis we included 621 cases of prostate and 1,205 of breast cancer and 872 male and 1,321 female population controls who had never worked night shift. Subjects were interviewed on timing of meals, sleep and chronotype and completed a Food Frequency Questionaire. Adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute of Cancer Research recommendations for cancer prevention was examined. Compared with subjects sleeping immediately after supper, those sleeping two or more hours after supper had a 20% reduction in cancer risk for breast and prostate cancer combined (adjusted Odds Ratio [OR] = 0.80, 95%CI 0.67-0.96) and in each cancer individually (prostate cancer OR = 0.74, 0.55-0.99; breast cancer OR = 0.84, 0.67-1.06). A similar protection was observed in subjects having supper before 9 pm compared with supper after 10 pm. The effect of longer supper-sleep interval was more pronounced among subjects adhering to cancer prevention recommendations (OR both cancers= 0.65, 0.44-0.97) and in morning types (OR both cancers = 0.66, 0.49-0.90). Adherence to diurnal eating patterns and specifically a long interval between last meal and sleep are associated with a lower cancer risk, stressing the importance of evaluating timing in studies on diet and cancer.

KEYWORDS:

breast cancer; circadian disruption; diet; prostate cancer

PMID:
30016830
PMCID:
PMC6220994
DOI:
10.1002/ijc.31649
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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