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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2018 Sep 1;103(9):3540-3547. doi: 10.1210/jc.2018-00855.

First Trimester Urinary Bisphenol and Phthalate Concentrations and Time to Pregnancy: A Population-Based Cohort Analysis.

Author information

1
The Generation R Study Group, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, CA Rotterdam, Netherlands.
2
Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, CA Rotterdam, Netherlands.
3
Department of Pediatrics, Sophia Children's Hospital, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, CA Rotterdam, Netherlands.
4
Department of Pediatrics, New York University School of Medicine, New York City, New York.
5
Department of Population of Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York City, New York.
6
Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, New York, New York.
7
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, State University of New York at Albany, Albany, New York, USA.
8
Department of Chemistry, the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
9
Biochemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
10
Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, CA Rotterdam, Netherlands.
11
New York University College of Global Public Health, New York City, New York.
12
Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York City, New York.
13
New York Wagner School of Public Service, New York City, New York.

Abstract

Background:

Increasing evidence suggests that exposure to synthetic chemicals such as bisphenols and phthalates can influence fecundability. The current study describes associations of first trimester urinary concentrations of bisphenol A (BPA), BPA analogs, and phthalate metabolites with time to pregnancy (TTP).

Methods:

Among 877 participants in the population-based Generation R pregnancy cohort, we measured first trimester urinary concentrations of bisphenols and phthalates [median gestational age, 12.9 weeks (interquartile range, 12.1, 14.4)]. We used fitted covariate-adjusted Cox proportional hazard models to examine associations of bisphenol and phthalate concentrations with TTP. Participants who conceived using infertility treatment were censored at 12 months. Biologically plausible effect measure modification by folic acid supplement use was tested.

Results:

In the main models, bisphenol and phthalate compounds were not associated with fecundability. In stratified models, total bisphenols and phthalic acid were associated with longer TTP among women who did not use folic acid supplements preconceptionally [respective fecundability ratios per each natural log increase were 0.90 (95% CI, 0.81 to 1.00) and 0.88 (95% CI, 0.79 to 0.99)]. Using an interaction term for the exposure and folic acid supplement use showed additional effect measure modification by folic acid supplement use for high-molecular-weight phthalate metabolites.

Conclusions:

We found no associations of bisphenols and phthalates with fecundability. Preconception folic acid supplementation seems to modify effects of bisphenols and phthalates on fecundability. Folic acid supplements may protect against reduced fecundability among women exposed to these chemicals. Further studies are needed to replicate these findings and investigate potential mechanisms.

PMID:
30016447
DOI:
10.1210/jc.2018-00855
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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