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ISME J. 2018 Nov;12(11):2770-2784. doi: 10.1038/s41396-018-0211-0. Epub 2018 Jul 16.

The evolution of ecological facilitation within mixed-species biofilms in the mouse gastrointestinal tract.

Author information

1
Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2R3, Canada. xlin3@ualberta.ca.
2
CEGIIR, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E1, Canada. xlin3@ualberta.ca.
3
Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2R3, Canada.
4
College of Engineering, China Agricultural University, 100083, Beijing, China.
5
Department of Biostatistics, University of Oslo, 0317, Oslo, Norway.
6
Helsinki Institute for Information Technology, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Helsinki, 00014, Helsinki, Finland.
7
CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100101, China.
8
Institute of Experimental Medicine, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Arnold-Heller-Straße 3, 24105, Kiel, Germany.
9
Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, August-Thienemann-Str. 2, 24306, Plön, Germany.
10
Department of Pathobiology and Population Sciences, The Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, Hatfield, Herfordshire, AL9 7TA, UK.
11
Nature Research Centre, Akademijos Str. 2, LT-08412, Vilnius, Lithuania.
12
CEGIIR, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E1, Canada.
13
Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, 68588, USA.
14
Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Unité Mixte de Recherche 5242, 46 Allée d'Italie, 69364, Lyon Cedex 07, France.
15
Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2R3, Canada. jwalter1@ualberta.ca.
16
CEGIIR, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E1, Canada. jwalter1@ualberta.ca.
17
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2R3, Canada. jwalter1@ualberta.ca.

Abstract

The eco-evolutionary interactions among members of the vertebrate gut microbiota that ultimately result in host-specific communities are poorly understood. Here we show that Lactobacillus reuteri coexists with  species that belong to the Lactobacillus johnsonii cluster (L. johnsonii, L. gasseri, and L taiwanensis) in a taxonomically wide range of rodents, suggesting cohabitation over evolutionary times. The two dominant Lactobacillus species found in wild mice establish a commensalistic relationship in gastric biofilms when introduced together into germ-free mice in which L. reuteri facilitates colonization of L. taiwanensis. Genomic analysis revealed allopatric diversification in strains of both species that originated from geographically separated locations (Scotland and France). Allopatry of the strains resulted in reduced formation of mixed biofilms in vitro, indicating that interspecies interactions in gastric Lactobacillus-biofilms are the result of an adaptive evolutionary process that occurred in a biogeographical context. In summary, these findings suggest that members within the vertebrate gut microbiota can evolve inter-dependencies through ecological facilitation, which could represent one mechanism by which host-specific bacterial communities assemble across vertebrate species and an explanation for their spatial and biogeographic patterns.

PMID:
30013162
PMCID:
PMC6193996
DOI:
10.1038/s41396-018-0211-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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