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BMC Geriatr. 2018 Jul 13;18(1):162. doi: 10.1186/s12877-018-0847-7.

Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS) reliably stratifies octogenarians in German ICUs: a multicentre prospective cohort study.

Author information

1
Division of Cardiology, Pulmonology, and Vascular Medicine, University Hospital Düsseldorf, Moorenstr. 5, 40225, Düsseldorf, Germany.
2
Division of Cardiology, Pulmonology, and Vascular Medicine, University Hospital Düsseldorf, Moorenstr. 5, 40225, Düsseldorf, Germany. amir.nia@med.uni-duesseldorf.de.
3
Department of Cardiology, Charité - University Hospital, Berlin, Germany.
4
German Center for Heart Research (DZHK), Berlin, Germany.
5
Department of Anaesthesiology and Operative Intensive Care Medicine, Campus Charité Mitte and Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin, Germany.
6
Department of Anaesthesiology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany.
7
Department of Internal Medicine I, Friedrich-Schiller-University, University Hospital Jena, Jena, Germany.
8
Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Jena, Jena, Germany.
9
Department for Medicine II, Catholic Hospital "St. Johann Nepomuk", Erfurt, Germany.
10
Department of Anaesthesiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University Munich, Munich, Germany.
11
Department of Clinical Toxicology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University Munich, Munich, Germany.
12
Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.
13
St. Vincenz Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Pneumology and Intensive Care Medicine, Limburg/Lahn, Limburg, Germany.
14
University Heart Center Luebeck, Department of Cardiology, Angiology, and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck, Germany.
15
German Center for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK), Partner Site Hamburg/Kiel/Luebeck, Luebeck, Germany.
16
Medical Faculty, West German Heart and Vascular Center, Department of Cardiology and Vascular Diseases, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany.
17
Department of Anaesthesiology, Intensive Care Medicine and Pain Therapy, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main, Germany.
18
Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
19
Department of General and Visceral Surgery, University Hospital Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.
20
Department of Anaesthesiology, Intensive Care Medicine and Pain Therapy, University Hospital Knappschaftskrankenhaus Bochum, Bochum, Germany.
21
Division of Intensive Care Medicine, Department of Anaesthesiology, University Hospital Ulm, Ulm, Germany.
22
Department of Anaesthesiology, Intensive Care Medicine and Pain Therapy, University Hospital Mainz, Mainz, Germany.
23
CARID, Cardiovascular Research Institute Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In intensive care units (ICU) octogenarians become a routine patients group with aggravated therapeutic and diagnostic decision-making. Due to increased mortality and a reduced quality of life in this high-risk population, medical decision-making a fortiori requires an optimum of risk stratification. Recently, the VIP-1 trial prospectively observed that the clinical frailty scale (CFS) performed well in ICU patients in overall-survival and short-term outcome prediction. However, it is known that healthcare systems differ in the 21 countries contributing to the VIP-1 trial. Hence, our main focus was to investigate whether the CFS is usable for risk stratification in octogenarians admitted to diversified and high tech German ICUs.

METHODS:

This multicentre prospective cohort study analyses very old patients admitted to 20 German ICUs as a sub-analysis of the VIP-1 trial. Three hundred and eight patients of 80 years of age or older admitted consecutively to participating ICUs. CFS, cause of admission, APACHE II, SAPS II and SOFA scores, use of ICU resources and ICU- and 30-day mortality were recorded. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with 30-day mortality.

RESULTS:

Patients had a median age of 84 [IQR 82-87] years and a mean CFS of 4.75 (± 1.6 standard-deviation) points. More than half of the patients (53.6%) were classified as frail (CFS ≥ 5). ICU-mortality was 17.3% and 30-day mortality was 31.2%. The cause of admission (planned vs. unplanned), (OR 5.74) and the CFS (OR 1.44 per point increase) were independent predictors of 30-day survival.

CONCLUSIONS:

The CFS is an easy determinable valuable tool for prediction of 30-day ICU survival in octogenarians, thus, it may facilitate decision-making for intensive care givers in Germany.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

The VIP-1 study was retrospectively registered on ClinicalTrials.gov (ID: NCT03134807 ) on May 1, 2017.

KEYWORDS:

Clinical frailty scale; Frailty; Intensive care outcome; VIP1

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