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J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich). 2018 Jul;20(7):1116-1121. doi: 10.1111/jch.13284.

Home blood pressure monitoring in the 21st century.

Author information

1
Hypertension Center STRIDE-7, School of Medicine, Third Department of Medicine, Sotiria Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
2
Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Jichi Medical University, School of Medicine, Tochigi, Japan.
3
Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, Green Templeton College, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
4
Department of Hygiene and Public Health, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
5
Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan, Italy.
6
Cardiology Unit and Department of Cardiovascular, Neural and Metabolic Sciences, Istituto Auxologco Italiano, S.Luca Hospital, Milano, Italy.
7
Tohoku Institute for Management of Blood Pressure, Sendai, Japan.

Abstract

Home blood pressure monitoring provides multiple measurements in the usual environment of each individual, allows the detection of intermediate hypertension phenotypes (white-coat and masked hypertension), and appears to have superior prognostic value compared to the conventional office blood pressure measurements. Accumulating evidence suggests that home blood pressure monitoring improves long-term hypertension control rates. Moreover, it is widely available, relatively inexpensive, and well accepted by patients. Thus, current guidelines recommend home blood pressure monitoring as an essential method for the evaluation of almost all untreated and treated patients with suspected or treated hypertension. Validated automated upper-arm cuff devices with automated storage and averaging of readings should be used. The home blood pressure monitoring schedule for 4 to 7 days with exclusion of the first day (12-24 readings) should be averaged to provide values for decision making.

KEYWORDS:

blood pressure measurement; diagnosis; self-measurement; treatment

PMID:
30003694
DOI:
10.1111/jch.13284
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