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Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2018 Sep;39(9):1042-1048. doi: 10.1017/ice.2018.148. Epub 2018 Jul 13.

Risk factors for surgical site infection after kidney and pancreas transplantation.

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1
1Multi-Organ Transplant Program,University Health Network,University of Toronto,Toronto,Ontario,Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the incidence of surgical site infection (SSI) in a cohort of pancreas transplant recipients and assess predisposing risk factors for SSI DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study SETTING: Single transplant center in CanadaPatientsPatients who underwent any simultaneous pancreas and kidney (SPK) or pancreas after kidney (PAK) transplant procedures between January 2000 and December 2015 METHODS: In this retrospective cohort evaluation of SPK or PAK recipients, we assessed the incidence of SSI and risk factors associated with superficial, deep, and organ/space SSI. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify independent risk factors for SSI in SPK and PAK recipients.

RESULTS:

In total, 445 adult transplant recipients were enrolled. The median age of these patients was 51 years (range, 19-71 years), and 64.9% were men. SSIs were documented in 108 patients (24.3%). Organ/space SSIs predominated (59 patients, 54.6%), followed by superficial SSIs (47 patients, 43.5%) and deep SSIs (3 patients, 2.8%). Factors predictive of SSIs in the multivariate analysis were cold pancreas ischemic time (odds ratio [OR], 1.002; P=.019) and SPK transplant (compared to PAK transplant recipients; OR, 2.38; P=.038). Patients with SSIs developed graft loss more frequently (OR, 16.99; P<.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Organ/space SSIs remain a serious and common complication after SPK and PAK. Prolonged cold ischemic time and SPK transplant were the risk factors predictive of SSIs. Appropriate perioperative prophylaxis in high-risk patients targeting the potential pathogens producing SSIs in kidney and/or pancreas transplant recipients and a reduction in cold ischemia may prove beneficial in reducing these SSIs.

PMID:
30001758
DOI:
10.1017/ice.2018.148

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