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Neuron. 2018 Jul 11;99(1):13-27. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2018.06.003.

Dendritic Tau in Alzheimer's Disease.

Author information

1
Dementia Research Unit, School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052, Australia.
2
Dementia Research Unit, School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052, Australia; Neuroscience Research Australia, Sydney, New South Wales 2031, Australia; Dementia Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales 2109, Australia. Electronic address: lars.ittner@mq.edu.au.

Abstract

The microtubule-associated protein tau and amyloid-β (Aβ) are key players in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aβ and tau are linked in a molecular pathway at the post-synapse with tau-dependent synaptic dysfunction being a major pathomechanism in AD. Recent work on site-specific modification of dendritic and more specifically post-synaptic tau has revealed new endogenous functions of tau that limits synaptic Aβ toxicity. Thus, molecular studies opened a new perspective on tau, placing it at the center of neurotoxic and neuroprotective signaling at the post-synapse. Here, we review recent advances on tau in the dendritic compartments, with implications for understanding and treatment of AD and related neurological conditions.

PMID:
30001506
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2018.06.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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