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Psychooncology. 2018 Nov;27(11):2602-2608. doi: 10.1002/pon.4839. Epub 2018 Aug 9.

Examining the dimensionality of the Fear of Cancer Recurrence Inventory.

Author information

1
School of Nursing, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
2
L.S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
3
Ingram School of Nursing, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
4
After Cancer Treatment Transition Clinic, Women's College Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
5
Women's College Research Institute, Women's College Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) is a common concern among cancer survivors, and the Fear of Cancer Recurrence Inventory (FCRI) is a frequently used measure to assess FCR. Given that the dimensionality of FCR has received recent debate, the overall goal of this secondary analysis was to re-examine the dimensionality of the FCRI using confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) to compare models of FCR, using data from a large sample of cancer survivors.

METHODS:

Three models of FCR (including unidimensional and multidimensional models of the FCRI) were informed by the literature and proposed a priori. Separate CFAs were conducted to test the fit of each model to the data, and models with acceptable fits were compared.

RESULTS:

Of all the tested FCR models, a multidimensional first-order model aligned with the originally developed 7-subscale FCRI revealed the best fit to the data (χ2  = 3359.135, P < .0001, df = 795, RMSEA = 0.057 [0.055, 0.059], CFI = 0.897, TLI = 0.888). When this 7-factor structure was loaded onto a single, second-order factor of overall FCR, the model fit statistics were slightly poorer (χ2  = 3459.632, P < .0001, df = 807, RMSEA = 0.058 [0.056, 0.060], CFI = 0.893, TLI = 0.886). However, the difference between the models was significant (chi-square difference = 103.142, P < .0001, df = 12) indicating that the first-order model was a better fit to the data.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results align with empirical and theoretical literature that supports the use of the FCRI as a multidimensional scale. Implications of results are discussed in light of FCR conceptualization and measurement.

KEYWORDS:

cancer; cancer survivors; factor analysis; fear; oncology; patient-reported outcome measures; psycho-oncology; recurrence; survivorship

PMID:
29998546
DOI:
10.1002/pon.4839

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