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Clin Chem Lab Med. 2018 Nov 27;56(12):1981-1991. doi: 10.1515/cclm-2018-0181.

Personalized laboratory medicine: a patient-centered future approach.

Author information

1
Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
2
Department of Biomedical, Experimental and Clinical Sciences, University of Florence, Florence, Italy.
3
Vita-Salute San Raffaele University and Division of Genetics and Cell Biology, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy.
4
Department of Hematology, University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
5
Unit for Special Laboratory Diagnostics, University Children's Hospital, University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
6
Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
7
Institute of Biomedicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
8
Department of Clinical Chemistry, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, TheNetherlands.
9
Biochemistry Department, University of Southern Denmark and Vejle Hospital, Vejle, Denmark.
10
Laboratory Medicine, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
11
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, University Hospital Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany.
12
Dr. Margarete Fischer-Bosch-Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Stuttgart, Germany.
13
Department of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany.

Abstract

In contrast to population-based medical decision making, which emphasizes the use of evidence-based treatment strategies for groups of patients, personalized medicine is based on optimizing treatment at the level of the individual patient. The creation of molecular profiles of individual patients was made possible by the advent of "omics" technologies, based on high throughput instrumental techniques in combination with biostatistics tools and artificial intelligence. The goal of personalized laboratory medicine is to use advanced technologies in the process of preventive, curative or palliative patient management. Personalized medicine does not rely on changes in concentration of a single molecular marker to make a therapeutic decision, but rather on changes of a profile of markers characterizing an individual patient's status, taking into account not only the expected response to treatment of the disease but also the expected response of the patient. Such medical approach promises a more effective diagnostics with more effective and safer treatment, as well as faster recovery and restoration of health and improved cost effectiveness. The laboratory medicine profession is aware of its key role in personalized medicine, but to empower the laboratories, at least an enhancement in cooperation between disciplines within laboratory medicine will be necessary.

KEYWORDS:

advanced omics technologies; diagnostic marker; genome; metabolome; molecular profiling; proteome; transcriptome

PMID:
29990304
DOI:
10.1515/cclm-2018-0181
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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