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Emerg Radiol. 2018 Oct;25(5):557-559. doi: 10.1007/s10140-018-1622-y. Epub 2018 Jul 10.

Herpes zoster ophthalmicus caught in the (Tr)act!

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, Stony Brook University Hospital, 101 Nicolls Road, Stony Brook, NY, USA. musa.mufti@stonybrookmedicine.edu.
2
Department of Radiology, Stony Brook University Hospital, 101 Nicolls Road, Stony Brook, NY, USA.
3
Department of Pathology, Stony Brook University Hospital, 101 Nicolls Road, Stony Brook, NY, USA.
4
Department of Radiology, Northport VA Medical Center, 79 Middleville Road, Northport, NY, USA.

Abstract

To emphasize the utility of contrast enhanced MRI for identifying the extent of disease in herpes zoster ophthalmicus with intracranial extension to help determine proper management. We present a rare case of herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZ/HZO) with intracranial extension and MRI demonstration of involvement of the trigeminal nerve, the trigeminal nucleus, and the spinal trigeminal nucleus and tract. Herpes zoster is caused by reactivation of varicella zoster virus. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus with involvement of the ophthalmic division of the trigeminal nerve has been estimated to account for 10-20% of the cases (Yawn et al. in Mayo Clin Proc 88:562-570, 2013). While postherpetic neuralgia is the most common complication, HZ/HZO can rarely manifest in a more sinister manner resulting in multi-dermatomal involvement, disseminated disease, cranial arteritis (Walker in Radiology 107:109-110, 1973), cranial nerve paresis (O.d in Clinical Eye and Vision Care 11:75-80, 1999), hemiplegia (Cavaletti in The Italian Journal of Neurological Sciences 11:297-300, 1990), ocular/dysfunction (Kocaoğlu in Türk Oftalmoloji Dergisi 48:42-46, 2018), and intracranial extension (Chen in BMC Infectious Diseases 17:213, 2017; Yawn in Mayo Clin Proc. 88:562-570, 2013). Contrast enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) can be of great benefit to elucidate the extent of disease and intracranial involvement for institution of more aggressive management to prevent further complications.

KEYWORDS:

Herpes zoster; Magnetic resonance imaging; Trigeminal

PMID:
29987527
DOI:
10.1007/s10140-018-1622-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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