Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Mol Cell Biol. 2018 Sep 14;38(19). pii: e00086-18. doi: 10.1128/MCB.00086-18. Print 2018 Oct 1.

The Cytotoxicity of Epsilon Toxin from Clostridium perfringens on Lymphocytes Is Mediated by MAL Protein Expression.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Pathology and Experimental Therapeutics, Campus of Bellvitge, University of Barcelona, Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain.
2
Biomedical Research Institute of Bellvitge (IDIBELL), Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain.
3
Institute of Neurosciences, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
4
Neurology Department, Bellvitge University Hospital, Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain.
5
Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Pathology and Experimental Therapeutics, Campus of Bellvitge, University of Barcelona, Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain blasi@ub.edu.

Abstract

Epsilon toxin (Etx) from Clostridium perfringens is a pore-forming protein that crosses the blood-brain barrier, binds to myelin, and, hence, has been suggested to be a putative agent for the onset of multiple sclerosis, a demyelinating neuroinflammatory disease. Recently, myelin and lymphocyte (MAL) protein has been identified to be a key protein in the cytotoxic effect of Etx; however, the association of Etx with the immune system remains a central question. Here, we show that Etx selectively recognizes and kills only human cell lines expressing MAL protein through a direct Etx-MAL protein interaction. Experiments on lymphocytic cell lines revealed that MAL protein-expressing T cells, but not B cells, are sensitive to Etx and reveal that the toxin may be used as a molecular tool to distinguish subpopulations of lymphocytes. The overall results open the door to investigation of the role of Etx and Clostridium perfringens on inflammatory and autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis.

KEYWORDS:

Clostridium perfringens; T cell; epsilon toxin; multiple sclerosis; myelin and lymphocyte protein; pore-forming toxins

PMID:
29987189
PMCID:
PMC6146834
DOI:
10.1128/MCB.00086-18
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center