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BMC Cancer. 2018 Jul 9;18(1):726. doi: 10.1186/s12885-018-4637-6.

Correlation between circulating tumour DNA and metabolic tumour burden in metastatic melanoma patients.

Author information

1
School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, 270 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, WA, 6027, Australia.
2
Department of Medical Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Hospital Avenue, Nedlands, WA, 6009, Australia.
3
Department of Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, Fiona Stanley Hospital, Murdoch, WA, 6150, Australia.
4
Department of Medical Oncology, Fiona Stanley Hospital, 11 Robin Warren Drive, Murdoch, WA, 6150, Australia.
5
School of Medicine and Pharmacology, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA, 6009, Australia.
6
School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA, 6009, Australia.
7
School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, 270 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, WA, 6027, Australia. e.gray@ecu.edu.au.
8
Centre for Opthalmology and Visual Science, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Western Australia, 6009, Australia. e.gray@ecu.edu.au.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) may serve as a measure of tumour burden and a useful tool for non-invasive monitoring of cancer. However, ctDNA is not always detectable in patients at time of diagnosis of metastatic disease. Therefore, there is a need to understand the correlation between ctDNA levels and the patients' overall metabolic tumour burden (MTB).

METHODS:

Thirty-two treatment naïve metastatic melanoma patients were included in the study. MTB and metabolic tumour volume (MTV) was measured by 18F-fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT). Plasma ctDNA was quantified using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR).

RESULTS:

CtDNA was detected in 23 of 32 patients. Overall, a significant correlation was observed between ctDNA levels and MTB (p < 0.001). CtDNA was not detectable in patients with an MTB of ≤10, defining this value as the lower limit of tumour burden that can be detected through ctDNA analysis by ddPCR.

CONCLUSIONS:

We showed that ctDNA levels measured by ddPCR correlate with MTB in treatment naïve metastatic melanoma patients and observed a limit in tumour size for which ctDNA cannot be detected in blood. Nevertheless, our findings support the use of ctDNA as a non-invasive complementary modality to functional imaging for monitoring tumour burden.

KEYWORDS:

Circulating tumour DNA; Droplet digital PCR; Melanoma; Metabolic tumour burden; Tumour lesion glycolysis; ctDNA

PMID:
29986670
PMCID:
PMC6038195
DOI:
10.1186/s12885-018-4637-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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