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J Histochem Cytochem. 2018 Nov;66(11):813-824. doi: 10.1369/0022155418788117. Epub 2018 Jul 9.

Characterization of Epidermal Lipoxygenase Expression in Normal Human Skin and Tissue-Engineered Skin Substitutes.

Author information

1
Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec-Université Laval and Centre de recherche en organogénèse expérimentale de l'Université Laval/LOEX, Quebec City, Québec, Canada.
2
Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval, Quebec City, Québec, Canada.
3
Department of Molecular Biology, Medical Biochemistry and Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval, Quebec City, Québec, Canada.

Abstract

Lipoxygenases (LOXs) are enzymes likely to be involved in corneocyte lipid envelope formation and skin barrier function. In humans, mutations in epidermis-type lipoxygenase 3 ( eLOX-3) and 12R-lipoxygenase ( 12R-LOX) genes are associated with autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI), whereas deletion of these genes in mice causes epidermal defects. LOXs also represent a matter of interest in psoriasis as well as in cancer research. However, their expression as well as the exact role of these enzymes in normal human skin have not been fully described. Our goal was to characterize the expression of epidermal LOXs in both normal human skin and Tissue-Engineered Skin Substitutes (TESS) and to consider TESS as a potential model for LOX functional studies. Staining for epidermal differentiation markers and LOXs was performed, in parallel, on normal human skin and TESS. Our results showed similar expression profiles in TESS when compared with native skin for e-LOX3, 12R-LOX, 12S-lipoxygenase (12S-LOX), and 15-lipoxygenase 2 (15-LOX-2) but not for 15-lipoxygenase 1 (15-LOX-1). Because of their appropriate epidermal differentiation and LOX expression, TESS represent an alternative model for future studies on LOX function.

KEYWORDS:

animal use alternative; antibodies; antibody specificity; cell culture techniques; epidermis; ichthyosis; skin diseases-genetic; staining and labeling

PMID:
29985723
PMCID:
PMC6213569
[Available on 2019-11-01]
DOI:
10.1369/0022155418788117

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