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Nat Commun. 2018 Jul 9;9(1):2655. doi: 10.1038/s41467-018-05184-7.

Gut microbiota associations with common diseases and prescription medications in a population-based cohort.

Author information

1
Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, King's College London, London, SE1 7EH, UK. matthew.jackson@kennedy.ox.ac.uk.
2
Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX3 7FY, UK. matthew.jackson@kennedy.ox.ac.uk.
3
Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, King's College London, London, SE1 7EH, UK.
4
Clinical Age Research Unit, King's College Hospital Foundation Trust, London, SE5 9RS, UK.
5
Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea.
6
Institute of Bioinformatics and Systems Biology, Helmholtz Zentrum München, 85764, Neuherberg, Germany.
7
Department of Oncological Sciences, Tisch Institute of Cancer, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, 10029, USA.
8
Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, King's College London, London, SE1 7EH, UK. claire.j.steves@kcl.ac.uk.
9
Clinical Age Research Unit, King's College Hospital Foundation Trust, London, SE5 9RS, UK. claire.j.steves@kcl.ac.uk.

Abstract

The human gut microbiome has been associated with many health factors but variability between studies limits exploration of effects between them. Gut microbiota profiles are available for >2700 members of the deeply phenotyped TwinsUK cohort, providing a uniform platform for such comparisons. Here, we present gut microbiota association analyses for 38 common diseases and 51 medications within the cohort. We describe several novel associations, highlight associations common across multiple diseases, and determine which diseases and medications have the greatest association with the gut microbiota. These results provide a reference for future studies of the gut microbiome and its role in human health.

PMID:
29985401
PMCID:
PMC6037668
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-018-05184-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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