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Oncotarget. 2018 Jun 19;9(47):28757-28771. doi: 10.18632/oncotarget.25550. eCollection 2018 Jun 19.

Trends and outcomes of women with synchronous endometrial and ovarian cancer.

Author information

1
Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
2
Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
3
Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA.
4
Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
5
Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, USA.

Abstract

This retrospective observational study examined trends, characteristics, and survival of women with synchronous endometrial and ovarian cancer (SEOC) in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program between 1973 and 2013. Among 235,454 women with primary endometrial cancer, synchronous ovarian cancer was seen in 4,082 (1.7%) women with the proportion being decreased from 2.0% to 1.6% between 1983 and 2013 (P=0.049); and the proportion of concurrent endometrioid tumors in the two cancer sites has increased from 24.2% to 49.9% among SEOC women (P<0.001). When compared to endometrial cancer without synchronous ovarian cancer, endometrioid histology in the two cancer sites was associated with improved cause-specific survival while non-endometrioid histology in the ovarian cancer was associated with decreased cause-specific survival (adjusted-P<0.01). Among 110,063 women with primary epithelial ovarian cancer, synchronous endometrial cancer was seen in 3,940 (3.6%) women with the proportion being increased from 2.2% to 4.4% between 1973 and 2013 (P<0.001); and the proportion of concurrent endometrioid tumors in the two cancer sites had increased from 24.3% to 50.2% among SEOC women (P<0.001). When compared to primary epithelial ovarian cancer without synchronous endometrial cancer, SEOC was associated with better cause-specific survival if ovarian cancer is endometrioid type or if endometrial cancer is endometrioid type (adjusted-P<0.001). Across the two cohorts, the proportion of SEOC reached to the peak in the late-40 years of age and then decreased significantly (P<0.001). In conclusion, our study suggests that synchronous ovarian cancer has decreased among endometrial cancer whereas synchronous endometrial cancer has increased among epithelial ovarian cancer.

KEYWORDS:

endometrial cancer; ovarian cancer; survival; synchronous; trend

Conflict of interest statement

CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Dr. Wright has served as a consultant for Clovis Oncology and Tesaro. Dr. Rimel has served as a consultant for Tesaro, AstraZeneca, and Genentech. The other authors have nothing to disclose.

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