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J Antimicrob Chemother. 2018 Jul 1;73(suppl_7):vii5-vii11. doi: 10.1093/jac/dky156.

Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of invasive isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae from Canadian patients: the SAVE study, 2011-15.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Microbiology, Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Room 543 - 745 Bannatyne Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0J9, Canada.
2
Clinical Microbiology, Diagnostic Services Manitoba, MS673-820 Sherbrook Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3A 1R9, Canada.
3
National Microbiology Laboratory, Public Health Agency of Canada, 1015 Arlington St, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 3M4, Canada.

Abstract

Objectives:

To assess antimicrobial susceptibility for 14 agents tested against 6001 invasive isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae cultured from invasive patient samples from 2011 to 2015 as a part of the annual SAVE study.

Methods:

Isolates of S. pneumoniae were tested using the standard CLSI broth microdilution method (M07-A10, 2015) with MICs interpreted by CLSI M100 27th Edition (2017) MIC breakpoints.

Results:

From 2011 to 2015, small but significant increases (P ≤ 0.05) in the percentage susceptibility for penicillin (interpreted by all three CLSI MIC breakpoint criteria) (increase of 1.7%-3.2%), clindamycin (3.1%) and ceftriaxone (interpreted by non-meningitis and meningitis CLSI MIC breakpoint criteria) (1.1%-1.5%) were observed. Susceptibility rates for clarithromycin and other commonly tested antimicrobial agents remained unchanged (P > 0.05) over the 5 year period. Isolates with an MDR phenotype (resistance to three or more antimicrobial agent classes) decreased significantly (P < 0.001) from 8.5% in 2011 to 5.6% in 2015. Antimicrobial susceptibility rates were not generally associated (P > 0.05) with patient gender (exception: clarithromycin) but were associated (P ≤ 0.05) with patient age (chloramphenicol and clindamycin) or specimen source (penicillin, doxycycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and clindamycin), as well as geographic location in Canada and concurrent resistance to penicillin or clarithromycin.

Conclusions:

The in vitro susceptibility of invasive isolates of S. pneumoniae in Canada to penicillin, clindamycin and ceftriaxone increased from 2011 to 2015, coincident with a significant decrease in MDR phenotypes.

PMID:
29982570
DOI:
10.1093/jac/dky156

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