Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sci Total Environ. 2018 Dec 10;644:207-216. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.05.321. Epub 2018 Jul 5.

The effect of saline-alkaline and water stresses on water use efficiency and standing biomass of Phragmites australis and Bolboschoenus planiculmis.

Author information

1
Key Laboratory of Wetland Ecology and Environment, Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130012, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049, China.
2
University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049, China; State Key Laboratory of Resources and Environmental Information System, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China.
3
ETH Zürich, Institute of Agricultural Sciences, 8092 Zürich, Switzerland.
4
Key Laboratory of Wetland Ecology and Environment, Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130012, China. Electronic address: louyj@iga.ac.cn.
5
Key Laboratory of Wetland Ecology and Environment, Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130012, China.
6
Chongqing Key Laboratory of Karst Environment, School of Geographical Sciences, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715, China.
7
Key Laboratory of Wetland Ecology and Environment, Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130012, China. Electronic address: luxg@iga.ac.cn.

Abstract

Salt marsh plants in the West Songnen Plain, northern China, are threatened by increasing soil salinity and alkalinity since the late 20th century. To explore how these wetland ecosystems respond to such environmental changes, we examined the effect of saline-alkaline stresses and water stress (flooding/drought) on water use efficiency (WUE, assessed with stable carbon isotopes) and standing biomass of Phragmites australis and Bolboschoenus planiculmis under both greenhouse and field conditions. In the field, sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) was the main saline-alkaline component, and the soil total ion content was negatively related to water level. Higher soil ion content decreased standing biomass of P. australis and B. planiculmis in the field and greenhouse, and increased WUE in the greenhouse. With higher water level, standing biomass of P. australis increased, while that of B. planiculmis decreased in both the field and greenhouse. Alkaline stress exerted the greatest negative influence on growth of P. australis, but only under high ion content. Low alkaline ion content promoted growth of B. planiculmis. Soil ion content exerted the strongest influence on foliar δ13C (and thus WUE) and standing biomass of both species compared to water level and stress type. Our findings suggest that under high ion contents, P. australis is more tolerant to flooding stress while B. planiculmis is more tolerant to drought stress. Moreover, P. australis has a high ability to modulate and increase WUE to resist its adverse environment. Our study will contribute to a better understanding of the influence of climate change and increasingly serious human disturbances on the distribution and productivity of these two important wetland species.

KEYWORDS:

Alkaline stress; Common reed; Foliar δ(13)C; Saline stress; Salt marsh; Salt stress; Wetland

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center