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J Racial Ethn Health Disparities. 2019 Feb;6(1):189-196. doi: 10.1007/s40615-018-0513-y. Epub 2018 Jul 6.

Gender Differences in Predictors of HIV Testing Among African American Young Adults.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, 806 West Franklin Street, Richmond, VA, 23284, USA. paigema2@vcu.edu.
2
Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, 806 West Franklin Street, Richmond, VA, 23284, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The primary aim of this study was to examine gender differences in predictors of past HIV test behavior among young African Americans.

METHOD:

Data from (n = 190) young adults participating in an evidenced-based safer sex behavioral intervention were analyzed. Participants completed measures of previous HIV testing, HIV test attitudes, HIV knowledge, HIV test behavior, and HIV risk behaviors. A series of t tests and chi-square tests were performed to assess gender differences in these variables. Multivariate logistic regressions were performed to examine the influence of HIV test attitudes, knowledge of where to get tested, and HIV risk behaviors on having previously been tested for HIV.

RESULTS:

Overall, approximately 58% of the sample had been previously tested for HIV. There were significant differences between groups on HIV risk factors (i.e., number of sexual partners), such that men reported a significantly higher number of sexual partners in the past 3 months. Men also reported more negative HIV testing attitudes compared with women. Predictors of past HIV testing differed by gender. Negative attitudes about HIV testing were associated with significantly lower odds of past HIV testing among men, but this was not a significant predictor of testing among women. Older age was significantly associated with greater odds of past HIV testing among women, but not among men.

CONCLUSIONS:

Understanding gender differences in predictors of HIV testing can provide important information for clinicians, counselors, and others working to increase rates of HIV testing among young Black/African American adults.

KEYWORDS:

HIV prevention; HIV testing; Minority health; Young adults

PMID:
29980991
PMCID:
PMC6320717
[Available on 2020-02-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s40615-018-0513-y

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