Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Biophys J. 2018 Jul 3;115(1):3-8. doi: 10.1016/j.bpj.2018.05.023.

Do Cellular Condensates Accelerate Biochemical Reactions? Lessons from Microdroplet Chemistry.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular & Integrative Physiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
2
Department of Molecular & Integrative Physiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Department of Computational Medicine & Bioinformatics, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Brehm Center for Diabetes Research, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Electronic address: schnells@umich.edu.

Abstract

Cellular condensates-phase-separated concentrates of proteins and nucleic acids-provide organizational structure for biochemistry that is distinct from membrane-bound compartments. It has been suggested that one major function of cellular condensates is to accelerate biochemical processes that are normally slow or thermodynamically unfavorable. Yet, the mechanisms leading to increased reaction rates within cellular condensates remain poorly understood. In this article, we highlight recent advances in microdroplet chemistry that accelerate reaction rates by many orders of magnitude as compared to bulk and suggest that similar mechanisms may also affect reaction kinetics in cellular condensates.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center