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J Proteomics. 2019 Mar 30;196:120-130. doi: 10.1016/j.jprot.2018.04.015. Epub 2018 Jun 30.

A proteomic insight into the MSP1 and flg22 induced signaling in Oryza sativa leaves.

Author information

1
Department of Plant Bioscience, Life and Energy Convergence Research Institute, Pusan National University, Miryang 627-706, South Korea.
2
Department of Plant Bioscience, Life and Energy Convergence Research Institute, Pusan National University, Miryang 627-706, South Korea. Electronic address: ravigupta@pusan.ac.kr.
3
Division of Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 02841, South Korea.
4
Plant Proteomics Group, Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Germany.
5
Department of Plant-Microbe Interactions, Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Carl-von-Linné Weg 10, 50829 Cologne, Germany.
6
Gene Engineering Division, National Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Rural Development Administration, Jeonju 54874, South Korea.
7
Plant Proteomics Group, Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Germany; Institute of Plant Biology and Biotechnology, University of Muenster, Schlossplatz 7, 48149 Muenster, Germany.
8
Department of Plant Bioscience, Life and Energy Convergence Research Institute, Pusan National University, Miryang 627-706, South Korea. Electronic address: stkim71@pusan.ac.kr.

Abstract

Previously, we reported a novel Magnaporthe oryzae- secreted protein MSP1, which triggers cell death and pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immune (PTI) responses in rice. To investigate the MSP1 induced defense response in rice at the protein level, we employed a label-free quantitative proteomic approach, in parallel with flg22 treatment, which is a well-known elicitor. Exogenous application of MSP1 to rice leaves induced an oxidative burst, MAPK3/6 activation, and activation of pathogenesis-related genes (DUF26, PBZ, and PR-10). MaxQuant based label free proteome analysis led to the identification of 4167 protein groups of which 433 showed significant differences in response to MSP1 and/or flg22 treatment. Functional annotation of the differential proteins showed that majority of the proteins related to primary, secondary, and lipid metabolism were decreased, while proteins associated mainly with the stress response, post-translational modification and signaling were increased in abundance. Moreover, several peroxidases and receptor kinases were induced by both the elicitors, highlighting their involvement in MSP1 and flg22 induced signaling in rice. Taken together, the results reported here contribute to our understanding of MSP1 and flg22 triggered immune responses at the proteome level, thereby increasing our overall understanding of PTI signaling in rice. BIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE: MSP1 is a M. oryzae secreted protein, which triggers defense responses in rice. Previous reports have shown that MSP1 is required for the pathogenicity of rice blast fungus, however, the exact mechanism of its action and its downstream targets in rice are currently unknown. Identification of the downstream targets is required in order to understand the MSP1 induced signaling in rice. Moreover, key proteins identified could also serve as potential candidates for the generation of disease resistance crops by modulating stress signaling pathways. Therefore, here we employed, for the first time, a label-free quantitative proteomic approach to investigate the MSP1 induced signaling in rice together with flg22. Functional annotation of the differential proteins showed that majority of the proteins related to primary, secondary, and lipid metabolism were decreased, while proteins related to the defense response, signaling and ROS detoxification were majorly increased. Thus, as an elicitor, recombinant MSP1 proteins could be utilized to inducing broad pathogen resistance in crops by priming the local immune responses.

KEYWORDS:

Label-free quantitative proteomics; MSP1; Magnaporthe oryzae; PAMP-triggered immunity; Rice

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