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Int J Rheum Dis. 2018 Jul;21(7):1343-1349. doi: 10.1111/1756-185X.13336.

Paresthesia frequency in fibromyalgia and its effects on personality traits.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Medical Faculty of Bozok University, Yozgat, Turkey.
2
Department of Neurology, Medical Faculty of Bozok University, Yozgat, Turkey.
3
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Spesial Hospital, Diyarbakır, Turkey.
4
Department of Neurosurgery, Medical Faculty of Bozok University, Yozgat, Turkey.
5
Department of Psychiatry, Okmeydanı Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.

Abstract

AIM:

Paresthesia and personality disorders are common conditions among patients with fibromyalgia. However, no previous study has examined a possible relation of paresthesia with personality traits in fibromyalgia. This study investigates the frequency of paresthesia in fibromyalgia patients and its relation with personality traits.

METHOD:

Female patients with fibromyalgia (n = 101) were divided into two groups according to the presence (n = 49; mean age 40.63 ± 7.62 years; range 23-55 years) or absence (n = 52; mean age 40.50 ± 7.12 years; range 27-53 years) of paresthesia. Also, a healthy control group (n = 53; mean age 39.34 ± 5.26 years; range 23-55 years) was included. The groups were evaluated by the Temperament and Character Inventory. Accordingly, temperament includes four dimensions: harm avoidance, novelty seeking, persistence, reward dependence; and character consists of three dimensions: cooperativeness, self-transcendence, self-directedness.

RESULTS:

There were no significant differences among the three groups in the scores of novelty seeking, persistence, reward dependence and cooperativeness (for all P > 0.05). Both fibromyalgia groups had significantly higher scores in harm avoidance and had lower scores in self-directedness compared to the control group (P < 0.001). Also, fibromyalgia patients with paresthesia had significantly higher harm avoidance and self-directedness scores than those in patients without paresthesia (P < 0.001). In both fibromyalgia groups, self-transcendence scores were similar (P = 0.465) but significantly higher than in the control group (P < 0.001).

CONCLUSION:

This is the first study evaluating the association of paresthesia and personality traits in fibromyalgia. These results suggest that psychological distress associated with high harm avoidance and low self-directedness scores are more prominent in fibromyalgia patients, and especially of those who have paresthesia.

KEYWORDS:

fibromyalgia; paresthesia; personality traits

PMID:
29968325
DOI:
10.1111/1756-185X.13336
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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