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AIDS Behav. 2019 Feb;23(2):433-444. doi: 10.1007/s10461-018-2194-2.

Low Birthweight, Retention in HIV Care, and Adherence to ART Among Postpartum Women Living with HIV in Ghana.

Author information

1
Social and Behavioral Interventions Program, Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA. ksakyi@oakland.edu.
2
Center for Learning and Childhood Development Ghana, AF 3190 Adenta Flats, Accra, Ghana. ksakyi@oakland.edu.
3
Department of Public and Environmental Wellness, School of Health Sciences, Oakland University, 3101 Human Health Building, 433 Meadow Brook Rd, Rochester, MI, 48309-4452, USA. ksakyi@oakland.edu.
4
Department of Medicine & Therapeutics, University of Ghana School of Medicine & Dentistry, CHS, P.O. Box GP 4236, Accra, Ghana.
5
Social and Behavioral Interventions Program, Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA.
6
Center for Learning and Childhood Development Ghana, AF 3190 Adenta Flats, Accra, Ghana.
7
Department of International Health, Global Epidemiology and Disease Control, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA.
8
Division of Infectious Disease and Global Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Florida, 2055 Mowry Road, Ste 250, PO Box 103600, Gainesville, FL, USA.

Abstract

Care for low birthweight (LBW) infants can contribute to psychological difficulties and stigma among mothers living with HIV, creating challenges for antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and retention in HIV care. We explored how caring for LBW infants affects maternal ART adherence and retention in care. We conducted 30 in-depth interviews with postpartum women living with HIV in Accra, Ghana: 15 with LBW infants and 15 with normal birthweight (NBW) infants. Compared to mothers with NBW infants, mothers with LBW infants described how caring for their newborns led to increased caregiver burden, prolonged hospital stays, and stigma-contributing to incomplete ART adherence and missed clinical appointments. For a few women, care for LBW infants created opportunities for re-engagement in HIV care and motivation to adhere to ART. Results suggest women living with HIV and LBW babies in Ghana face increased challenges that impact their adherence to care and ART.

KEYWORDS:

ART adherence; Low birthweight; Postpartum women; Qualitative; Retention in HIV care

PMID:
29968140
DOI:
10.1007/s10461-018-2194-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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