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J Crit Care Med (Targu Mures). 2016 Nov 8;2(4):201-204. doi: 10.1515/jccm-2016-0027. eCollection 2016 Oct.

A Fatal Case of Community Acquired Cupriavidus Pauculus Pneumonia.

Author information

1
Discipline of Intensive Care, University of Medicine and Pharmacy Tîrgu Mureş, Tîrgu Mureş, Romania.
2
Discipline of Infectious Diseases, University of Medicine and Pharmacy Tîrgu Mureş, Tîrgu Mureş, Romania.

Abstract

Introduction:

Cupriavidus pauculus is a rarely isolated non-fermentative, aerobic bacillus, which occasionally causes severe human infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. Strains have been isolated from various clinical and environmental sources.

Case presentation:

A 67-year-old man was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit with acute respiratory failure. The patient was diagnosed with bilateral pneumonia, pulmonary sepsis and underwent invasive mechanical ventilation. Examination revealed diminished bilateral vesicular breath sounds, fever, intense yellow tracheal secretions, a respiratory rate of 24/minute, a heart rate of 123/minute, and blood pressure of 75/55 mmHg. Vasoactive treatment was initiated. Investigations revealed elevated lactate and C-reactive protein levels. A chest X-ray showed bilateral infiltration. Parenteral ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone were administered. Tracheal aspirate culture and blood culture showed bacterial growth of Cupriavidus pauculus. Colistin was added to the treatment. There was a poor clinical response despite repeated blood culture showing negative results. The diagnosis of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) caused by C. pauculus was made. The patient died eleven days after admission.

Conclusions:

Clinical improvement cannot always be expected in spite of targeted antibiotic therapy. This pathogen should be considered responsible for infections that usually develop in immunocompromised patients.

KEYWORDS:

Cupriavidus pauculus; pneumonia; sepsis

Conflict of interest statement

Conflict of interest: The authors have no conflict of interest regarding the development of this study.

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