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Nat Med. 2018 Aug;24(8):1104-1107. doi: 10.1038/s41591-018-0088-5. Epub 2018 Jul 2.

Miscarriage and stillbirth following maternal Zika virus infection in nonhuman primates.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA.
2
California National Primate Research Center, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA, USA. kkvanrompay@ucdavis.edu.
3
Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA, USA. kkvanrompay@ucdavis.edu.
4
Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA, USA.
5
California National Primate Research Center, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA, USA.
6
Department of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Portland, OR, USA.
7
Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USA.
8
Division of Pathobiology and Immunology, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Portland, OR, USA.
9
Division of Comparative Medicine, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Portland, OR, USA.
10
Pathology Services Unit, Division of Comparative Medicine, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Portland, OR, USA.
11
Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USA. streblow@ohsu.edu.
12
Division of Pathobiology and Immunology, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Portland, OR, USA. streblow@ohsu.edu.
13
Southwest National Primate Research Center, Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research, San Antonio, TX, USA. stardif@txbiomed.org.
14
Department of Virology and Immunology, Texas Biomedical Research Institute, San Antonio, TX, USA.
15
Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.
16
Department of Molecular and Human Genetics at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.
17
Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
18
Department of Medicine/Infectious Diseases, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
19
Division of Microbiology, Tulane National Primate Research Center, New Orleans, LA, USA. apanagani@tulane.edu.
20
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Tulane University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA, USA. apanagani@tulane.edu.
21
Division of Comparative Pathology, Tulane National Primate Research Center, New Orleans, LA, USA.
22
Division of Microbiology, Tulane National Primate Research Center, New Orleans, LA, USA.
23
Division of Veterinary Medicine, Tulane National Primate Research Center, New Orleans, LA, USA.
24
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. adamsk@u.washington.edu.
25
Department of Immunology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
26
Center for Innate Immunity and Immune Disease, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
27
Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
28
Center for Global Infectious Disease Research, Seattle Children's Research Institute, Seattle, WA, USA.
29
Washington National Primate Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
30
Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA.
31
Wisconsin National Primate Research Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA.
32
Department of Pathobiological Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA.
33
Department of Comparative Biosciences and Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA.
34
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA. dhoconno@wisc.edu.
35
Wisconsin National Primate Research Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA. dhoconno@wisc.edu.

Abstract

Zika virus (ZIKV) infection is associated with congenital defects and pregnancy loss. Here, we found that 26% of nonhuman primates infected with Asian/American ZIKV in early gestation experienced fetal demise later in pregnancy despite showing few clinical signs of infection. Pregnancy loss due to asymptomatic ZIKV infection may therefore be a common but under-recognized adverse outcome related to maternal ZIKV infection.

PMID:
29967348
PMCID:
PMC6082723
[Available on 2019-01-02]
DOI:
10.1038/s41591-018-0088-5

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