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Nutrients. 2018 Jun 29;10(7). pii: E852. doi: 10.3390/nu10070852.

Prospective Associations between Single Foods, Alzheimer's Dementia and Memory Decline in the Elderly.

Author information

1
Department of Geriatrics and Aging Research, University Hospital Zurich, 8091 Zurich, Switzerland. karina.fischer@uzh.ch.
2
Centre on Aging and Mobility, University of Zurich and City Hospital Waid, 8037 Zurich, Switzerland. karina.fischer@uzh.ch.
3
Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Nutritional Epidemiology, University of Bonn, 53113 Bonn, Germany. karina.fischer@uzh.ch.
4
German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), 53127 Bonn, Germany. deboramelovanlent@gmail.com.
5
German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), 53127 Bonn, Germany. Steffen.Wolfsgruber@ukb.uni-bonn.de.
6
Department of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Geriatric Psychiatry, University of Bonn, 53105 Bonn, Germany. Steffen.Wolfsgruber@ukb.uni-bonn.de.
7
Department of Medical Biometry, Informatics and Epidemiology, University Hospital Bonn, 53105 Bonn, Germany. weinhold@imbie.uni-bonn.de.
8
German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), 53127 Bonn, Germany. Luca.Kleineidam@ukbonn.de.
9
Department of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Geriatric Psychiatry, University of Bonn, 53105 Bonn, Germany. Luca.Kleineidam@ukbonn.de.
10
Department of Psychiatry, Technical University of Munich, 81675 Munich, Germany. horst.bickel@tum.de.
11
Department of Primary Medical Care, Center for Psychosocial Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, 20246 Hamburg, Germany. m.scherer@uke.de.
12
Department of Primary Medical Care, Center for Psychosocial Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, 20246 Hamburg, Germany. meisele@uke.uni-hamburg.de.
13
Department of Primary Medical Care, Center for Psychosocial Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, 20246 Hamburg, Germany. bussche@uke.de.
14
WG Medical Statistics and IT-Infrastructure, Institute of General Practice, Hannover Medical School, 30625 Hannover, Germany. wiese.birgitt@mh-hannover.de.
15
Department of Health Economics and Health Services Research, Hamburg Center for Health Economics, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, 20246 Hamburg, Germany. h.koenig@uke.de.
16
Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim/Heidelberg University, 68159 Mannheim, Germany. Siegfried.Weyerer@zi-mannheim.de.
17
Institute of General Practice, Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, 40227 Düsseldorf, Germany. Pentzek@med.uni-duesseldorf.de.
18
Institute of Social Medicine, Occupational Health and Public Health, University of Leipzig, 01403 Leipzig, Germany. Susanne.Roehr@medizin.uni-leipzig.de.
19
LIFE-Leipzig Research Center for Civilization Diseases, University of Leipzig, 01403 Leipzig, Germany. Susanne.Roehr@medizin.uni-leipzig.de.
20
Department of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Geriatric Psychiatry, University of Bonn, 53105 Bonn, Germany. wolfgang.maier@ukb.uni-bonn.de.
21
German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), 53127 Bonn, Germany. frank.jessen@uk-koeln.de.
22
Department of Psychiatry, Medical Faculty, University of Cologne, 50924 Cologne, Germany. frank.jessen@uk-koeln.de.
23
German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), 53127 Bonn, Germany. matthias.schmid@imbie.uni-bonn.de.
24
Department of Medical Biometry, Informatics and Epidemiology, University Hospital Bonn, 53105 Bonn, Germany. matthias.schmid@imbie.uni-bonn.de.
25
Institute of Social Medicine, Occupational Health and Public Health, University of Leipzig, 01403 Leipzig, Germany. Steffi.Riedel-Heller@medizin.uni-leipzig.de.
26
German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), 53127 Bonn, Germany. michael.wagner@uni-bonn.de.
27
Department of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Geriatric Psychiatry, University of Bonn, 53105 Bonn, Germany. michael.wagner@uni-bonn.de.

Abstract

Background: Evidence whether single &ldquo;cognitive health&rdquo; foods could prevent cognitive decline is limited. We investigated whether dietary intake of red wine, white wine, coffee, green tea, olive oil, fresh fish, fruits and vegetables, red meat and sausages, assessed by a single-food-questionnaire, would be associated with either incident Alzheimer&rsquo;s dementia (AD) or verbal memory decline. Methods: Participants aged 75+ of the German Study on Aging, Cognition and Dementia in Primary Care Patients (AgeCoDe) cohort were regularly followed over 10 years (n = 2622; n = 418 incident AD cases). Multivariable-adjusted joint modeling of repeated-measures and survival analysis was used, taking gender and Apolipoprotein E4 (APOE &epsilon;4) genotype into account as possible effect modifiers. Results: Only higher red wine intake was associated with a lower incidence of AD (HR = 0.92; P = 0.045). Interestingly, this was true only for men (HR = 0.82; P < 0.001), while in women higher red wine intake was associated with a higher incidence of AD (HR = 1.15; P = 0.044), and higher white wine intake with a more pronounced memory decline over time (HR = &minus;0.13; P = 0.052). Conclusion: We found no evidence for these single foods to be protective against cognitive decline, with the exception of red wine, which reduced the risk for AD only in men. Women could be more susceptible to detrimental effects of alcohol.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer´s dementia; apolipoprotein E ε4; cognitive decline; dementia; food intake; gender; memory decline

PMID:
29966314
PMCID:
PMC6073331
DOI:
10.3390/nu10070852
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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