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PLoS One. 2018 Jul 2;13(7):e0199916. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0199916. eCollection 2018.

Long-term metabolic effects of malnutrition: Liver steatosis and insulin resistance following early-life protein restriction.

Author information

1
Translational Medicine Research Program, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada.
2
Morosky College of Health Professions and Sciences, Gannon University, Erie, PA, United States of America.
3
Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
4
Department of Pediatric Laboratory Medicine, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada.
5
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.

Abstract

Early postnatal-life malnutrition remains prevalent globally, and about 45% of all child deaths are linked to malnutrition. It is not clear whether survivors of childhood malnutrition suffer from long-term metabolic effects, especially when they are later in life exposed to a fat and carbohydrate rich obesogenic diet. The lack of knowledge around this dietary "double burden" warrants studies to understand the long-term consequences of children previously exposed to malnutrition. We hypothesized that an early-life nutritional insult of low protein consumption in mice would lead to long-term metabolic disturbances that would exacerbate the development of diet-induced insulin resistance and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We investigated the effects of feeding a low protein diet (4% wt/wt) immediately after weaning for four weeks and subsequent feeding of a high carbohydrate high fat feeding for 16 weeks on metabolic function and development of NAFLD. Mice exposed to early-life protein restriction demonstrated a transient glucose intolerance upon recovery by regular chow diet feeding. However, protein restriction after weaning in mice did not exacerbate an obesogenic diet-induced insulin resistance or progression to NAFLD. These data suggest that transient protein restriction in early-life does not exacerbate an obesogenic diet-induced NAFLD and insulin resistance.

PMID:
29965973
PMCID:
PMC6028108
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0199916
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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