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Clin Infect Dis. 2018 Nov 28;67(12):1861-1867. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciy376.

Viral Load in the Natural History of Human Papillomavirus Infection Among Men in Rural China: A Population-based Prospective Study.

Author information

1
Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education/Beijing), Laboratory of Genetics, Peking University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Beijing, People's Republic of China.

Abstract

Background:

High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) load is predictive of HR-HPV persistence and subsequent carcinogenesis in women. However, in men, data on genital HPV load and its effect on the natural history of HPV infection are limited.

Methods:

The subjects included 1532 men aged 25-65 years with up to 7 biannual visits for evaluation of genital HPV load in rural China during 2009-2013 who were positive for ≥1 of the 18 selected HPV types (including 10 HR-HPV types) detected by general primer-mediated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing. Type-specific HPV load was quantified with real-time PCR and dichotomized based on median values.

Results:

Men with multiple lifetime sex partners were more likely to have higher overall levels of HR-HPV load across visits (adjusted odds ratio, 2.42; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-5.24; 2 partners vs 0-1 partner). Higher levels of HR-HPV load at the time of the first HPV diagnosis conferred an increased probability of the subject remaining type-specific HPV-positive up to 12 months and an increased probability of persistent/intermittent infection (virus detected repeatedly with or without a period of intercurrent negativity) versus transient infections (single-time positive). Higher overall HR-HPV levels were predictive of reduced HR-HPV clearance rates (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.47; 95% CI, .27-.83).

Conclusions:

Having multiple lifetime sex partners is associated with increased male genital HR-HPV load. Higher HR-HPV load predicts persistence of HR-HPV in men from rural China.

PMID:
29961890
DOI:
10.1093/cid/ciy376

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