Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Trends Microbiol. 2018 Sep;26(9):729-732. doi: 10.1016/j.tim.2018.05.011. Epub 2018 Jun 27.

The Aftermath of Zika: Need for Long-Term Monitoring of Exposed Children.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Center for Innate Immunity and Immune Disease and Department of Global Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: adamsk@uw.edu.
2
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Department of Educational Psychology, School Psychology Program, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
3
Center for Integrative Brain Research, Seattle Children's Research Institute, Seattle, WA, USA.
4
4th Dimension Biomedical Research Communications, Victoria, Canada.
5
Department of Pediatrics, Center for Innate Immunity and Immune Disease, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; Center for Global Infectious Disease Research, Seattle Children's Research Institute, Seattle, WA, USA. Electronic address: lakshmi.rajagopal@seattlechildrens.org.

Abstract

Pregnancy infections with Zika virus are associated with a spectrum of fetal brain injuries beyond microcephaly. Nonmicrocephalic children exposed to Zika virus in utero or early life should undergo neurodevelopmental testing to identify deficits and allow for early intervention. Additionally, long-term monitoring for higher order neurocognitive deficits should be implemented.

KEYWORDS:

Zika virus; congenital Zika syndrome; fetus; flavivirus; neurocognitive testing; pregnancy

PMID:
29960747
PMCID:
PMC6136144
DOI:
10.1016/j.tim.2018.05.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center