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Addict Behav. 2019 Apr;91:201-207. doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.05.025. Epub 2018 Jun 2.

Adolescents' receptivity to E-cigarette harms messages delivered using text messaging.

Author information

1
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, United States; Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, United States. Electronic address: noar@unc.edu.
2
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, United States.
3
Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, United States.
4
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, United States; Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, United States.
5
Wake Forest School of Medicine, United States.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

E-cigarette use among adolescents has dramatically risen since 2011, yet little research has tested e-cigarette harms messages among adolescents. We conducted a pretest-posttest pilot study to examine adolescents' receptivity to e-cigarette health harms messages delivered using text messaging.

METHODS:

N = 69 adolescents were enrolled in an 8-day pretest-posttest text messaging study. Participants completed a pretest survey on day one, were texted one of three e-cigarette health harms messages per day on days two through seven, and completed a posttest survey on day eight (88% retention). We assessed message ratings at posttest and knowledge, thoughts, and beliefs about e-cigarette harms at pretest and posttest.

RESULTS:

Adolescents rated the three messages favorably, with both the chemical and brain messages scoring higher than the nicotine message on fear arousal and perceived message effectiveness. More than one-third of adolescents showed the messages to others and talked to others about the messages. At posttest, knowledge about the harms of e-cigarettes, thinking about the risks of e-cigarettes, and perceived risks of e-cigarettes were all significantly higher compared to pretest (p < .05). Participants largely adhered to the text messaging protocol and found the study highly acceptable.

CONCLUSIONS:

This pilot study suggests that adolescents are receptive to e-cigarette health harms messages and that delivering such messages using text messaging is feasible and acceptable. Future research should systematically develop and test a broad set of e-cigarette health harms messages and examine their impact in a randomized controlled trial.

KEYWORDS:

E-cigarette; Health; Message; Text messaging; Vaping; Warning

PMID:
29960716
PMCID:
PMC6275144
[Available on 2020-04-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.05.025

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